Courses

Teaching students how to think and to write rigorously and creatively about issues of public life

Spring 2008

Course Index & Descriptions

Introductory Courses
Note:Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class. Introductory courses are also offered during summer session.
131 Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics
161 Introduction to Political Philosophy
Major Seminars
Note: Registration procedure for seminars has changed! Add seminar to your schedule during on-line pre-enrollment. If ‘filled’ message appears, after classes have already started use an add-drop slip; professor’s signature is required.
400.02 International Trade Policy
400.03 Comparative Political Thought
400.04 African Politics
Other Major Seminar Choices
405 The Postmodern Presidency
414 Causes & Consequences of U.S. Foreign Policy
424 Contemporary American Politics
430 Biotechnology & Development
461 Interpreting Race & Racism
462 Sexuality and The Law
464 Theories of Empire
480 Politics of 70’s Films
American Government and Institutions
318 The U.S. Congress
328 The US Supreme Court
405 The Postmodern Presidency
414 Causes & Consequences of U.S. Foreign Policy
424 Contemporary American Politics
603 Field Seminar in American Politics
613 The Politics of Inequality.
614 Causes & Consequences of U.S. Foreign Policy
629 Contemporary American Politics
Comparative Politics
331 Middle Eastern Politics
336 Postcommunist Transitions
339 Political Economy of Development
341 Modern Euro Society & Politics
430 Biotechnology & Development
635 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics
639 Comparative Pol. Participation
652 Methods for Field Research
692 The Administration of Agriculture and Rural Development
Political Theory
360 Ideology
364 Politics of “Nations Within”
461 Interpreting Race & Racism
462 Sexuality and The Law
464 Theories of Empire
480 Politics of 70’s Films
607 Field Sem in Pol Thought
667 Derrida & Phil of Hospitality
678 Theories of Empire
762 Sexuality and The Law
International Relations
282 China and the World
343 Politics of the European Union
386 The Causes of War
395 New Forces in International Politics
Methods
602 Methods of Political Analysis II
Honors Courses
495 Honors: Research & Writing
Graduate Seminars
Note: Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 600 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor.
699 CPAS Weekly Colloquium
Cross-listed courses
330 Politics of the Global North. Cross-listed with ILR
363 Politics & Culture. Cross-listed with Sociology
368 Global Justice. Cross-listed with Philosophy
370 Political Theory and Cinema. Cross-listed with German Studies
427 The Animal. Cross-listed with German Studies
433 Nationalism(s) in Arab World. Cross-listed with Near Eastern Studies

131 Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics
3 Credits | TR 10:10-11:25 | Roberts, K

Explores political institutions and processes in major regions of the world–Western and Eastern Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. Students are introduced to comparative methods of political analysis, and they develop conceptual and theoretical tools to analyze political issues like democratization, authoritarianism, revolution, ethnic conflict, and the political economy of development. Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class. Introductory courses are also offered during summer session.

161 Introduction to Political Philosophy
3 credits | TR 2:55-4:10 | Kramnick, I

A survey of the development of Western political theory from Plato to the present. Readings from the works of the major theorists. An examination of the relevance of their ideas to contemporary politics.

Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class. Introductory courses are also offered during summer session.

282 China and the World
3 credits | TR 8:40-9:55 | Carlson, A

In this course we study the dramatic rise of China through reviewing major developments in contemporary Chinese foreign policy since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and more specifically concentrating on major developments in Chinese foreign policy during the 1980s and 1990s. Such a wide-ranging survey of Chinese foreign policy will involve not only a consideration of the evolution of China’s relations with its major bilateral partners, but also an investigation of how China has defined its broader relationship with the international system. In addition, students will be asked to consider which causal factors have been of primary importance in motivating Chinese behavior. (IR)

318 The U.S. Congress
4 credits | MWF 2:30-3:20 | Shefter, M

The role of Congress in the American political system. Topics to be discussed: the political setting within which Congress operates, the structure of Congress, the salient features of the legislative process, and recent congressional behavior in a number of policy areas.

328 The US Supreme Court
4 credits | TR 1:25-2:40 | Mink, W

The course investigates the role of the Supreme Court in American politics and government. It traces the historical development of constitutional doctrine and the institutional role the court has played in American politics. This semester the course will focus on 14th amendment jurisprudence of equality and rights.

330 Politics of the Global North
4 credits | TR 11:40-12:55 | Turner, L

See ILRIC 333

330 Middle Eastern Politics
credits | MWF 11:15-12:05 | Patel, D

This course provides an introduction to contemporary Middle Eastern politics. The goal is to provide students with historical background and theoretical tools to answer the following core questions: (1) Why do authoritarian political systems persist in the Middle East more than they do elsewhere? (2) Why have Islamist groups become prominent opposition forces in and across some countries? (3) Why do some Middle Eastern countries suffer from high levels of political violence while others are spared? (4) What accounts for the region’s current economic underdevelopment? (5) Would the adoption of Western-style political institutions improve governance and stability in the region? The course explicitly compares outcomes and explanations within the region, between the region and other world areas, and over time.

336 Postcommunist Transitions
4 credits | TR 8:40-9:55 | Bunce, V

The focus of the course is on political and economic developments since the collapse of communism in the 28 states that make up Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Topics to be addressed include why democracy has developed in some countries, but not others in the region; differences in economic performance across the region; the role of the United States and the European Union in promoting democratic governance. The geographical focus will shift, depending upon the topic at hand.

339 Political Economy of Development
4 credits | MW 8:40-9:55 | van de Walle, N

This course examines the political economy of developing countries. It addresses the questions: What is development? How have our ideas about development and its causes changed over time? How have the experiences of people living in developing countries improved or worsened? Where should we focus our development efforts in the future? The first half of the course surveys major theories over the past 50 years about how states develop economically and politically. The second half examines some current development issues.

341 Modern Euro Society & Politics
4 credits | TR 11:40-12:55 | Van Morgan, S

This survey course provides an interdisciplinary overview of European affairs from the past to the present. Themes of the course will include, but will not be limited to, European political development from the nineteenth century forward, political and economic integration, developments in the welfare states of Europe, party systems and elections, immigration and demography, culture and identity, foreign policy, the shifting roles of women, and the special challenges faced by Eastern Europe and Russia. A series of background and contextual lectures will be complemented by presentations delivered by leading Europeanists. (CO)

343 Politics of the European Union
4 credits | TR 2:55-4:10 | Zimmermann, H

Despite recent bad feelings, the countries constituting the European Union (EU) still remain the most important partners for the U.S. in the world. And despite the rise of China and other Asian countries, the EU, together with the US, still calls the tune in the international economy. However, even citizens of the European Union generally know very little about how this complex structure works. This course explores the policies and policy-making of the European Union against the backdrop of the postwar history of European integration and the institutional framework of the EU. How did nation states with different cultures and no common language manage to combine their own particular interests with the general interest of an integrated union? Why does the EU work well in some areas, but fails to do so in others? We will furthermore consider the external dimension of the EU and explore current debates about the emerging European polity, in particular the European constitution. Throughout the course we will reflect on parallels with the American political system and on the state of current transatlantic relations. (IR)

360 Ideology
4 credits | MW 2:55-4:10 | Rubenstein, D

This course will focus on critical approaches to the study of ideology in order to understand the role of ideology in political subject formation. After an initial presentation of the classical Marxist texts on ideology, we will examine twentieth century reworkings of hegemony theorist Antonio Gramsci and the critical structuralist approaches of Roland Barthes, Jean Baudrillard and Dick Hebdige. We will concentrate on the “lived relation” to ruling ideas in the form of ideologies of everyday life. The second part of the course will be devoted to psychoanalytically oriented theories (Freud, Lacan) which address the internalization of belief, both in relation to the intrapsychic and in the interaction between psychic and state apparatuses. We conclude with Louis Althusser’s notion of interpellation, which resumes the Marxist, structuralist and psychoanalytic objectives of the course material. The theorists in the second part of the course will be contextualized within the experience of the historical traumas of fascism and French decolonization. Throughout the semester, we will be reflecting on the continued relevance of historic ideologies, centered around notions of class interest, to late twentieth century ideologies’ attachments to national, religious, gendered, ethnic, technological identity. (PT)

363 Politics & Culture
4 credits | TR 1:25-2:15 | Berezin, M

See SOC 248

364 Politics of "Nations Within"
4 credits | TR 10:10-11:25 | Hendrix, B

This political theory course will consider the political status of Native Americans in the United States, as well as the status of indigenous peoples in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. We will begin with brief overviews of native peoples in the countries considered, with special attention to the history of their interactions with the states that now rule them, and their contemporary legal status. The course will consider the ideologies used to justify conquests and displacements by European colonists, particularly as illustrated in historical works of political theory and key court cases. The latter half of the course will consider the possible futures of these “nations within” by considering normative arguments about assimilation, cultural rights, treaty federalism, and full sovereign statehood.

368 Global Justice
4 credits | TR 2:55-4:10 | Miller, R

See PHIL 347

370 Political Theory and Cinema
4 credits | TR 11:40-12:55 | Waite, G

See GERST 355.

386 The Causes of War
4 credits | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Way, C

This course surveys leading theories of the causes of interstate war–that is, large scale organized violence between the armed forces of states. Why is war a recurring feature of international politics? Are democracies more peaceful than other types of states, and if so what explains this “democratic peace”? Why do democratic publics seem to reward threats to use force by “rallying around the flag” in support of their governments? Does the inexorable pattern of the rise and fall of nations lead to cycles of great power wars throughout history? These and other questions will be examined in our survey of theories of war at three levels of analysis: the individual and small groups, domestic politics, and the international system. Topics covered include: 1) theoretical explanations for war; 2) evaluation of the evidence for the various explanations; 3) the impact of nuclear weapons on international politics; 4) ethics and warfare; 5) the uses and limitations of air power; 6) international terrorism. (IR)

395 New Forces in International Politics
4 credits | TR 10:10-11:25 | Koinova, M

How important are regional groupings, non-governmental organizations, narco-terrorists, ethnic groups and transnational environmental issues, within international politics? These forces seem to be occupying an increasingly central position in the international arena, yet the factors that have caused their rise, and the degree to which they have transformed the face of international politics, are still poorly understood. In this course we will address such issues through exploring how students of international politics have described and explained the emergence of these new forces in the international system during the post-Cold War period. In short, the course will focus on determining the extent to which we are witnessing a transformation of the international political system, and why such a change is (or is not) taking place.

400.02 International Trade Policy
4 credits | W 2:30-4:25 | Zimmermann, H

This seminar will deal with contentious issues in international trade and finance and how they are resolved through international negotiations. After dealing with conceptual and theoretical instruments to analyze international economic negotiations, we will look at the decision-making processes of the big trading blocs (especially the EU and the US) and deal with some of the most significant and interesting cases of cooperation and conflict in international trade. Issues will include free trade negotiations, such as NAFTA and the U.S.-Canadian Free Trade Agreement, multilateral talks, such as the Uruguay and Doha rounds, clashes between the EU and the U.S. on agricultural issues (GMO-Food, Bananas, Subsidies) and high-tech industries (Airbus/Boeing), and problems of trading with developing countries. We will also analyze some closely related current issues in international finance, such as the fall of the dollar, the international impact of the American subprime mortgage crisis, or the international governance of hedge funds, private equity firms, and sovereign wealth funds.

400.03 Comparative Political Thought
4 credits | M 12:20-2:15 | Hendrix, B

While there are many strands of political theory within "Western" intellectual traditions, there are also multiple other traditions of political theory that are more rarely studied. This course will consider the question of what it means to compare works of political theory across intellectual and cultural traditions, and whether diverse traditions should be seen as inherently distinctive or whether similar problems and solutions tend to occur across traditions. This seminar course will focus on works from classical Greece and China, medieval works by Islamic philosophers, and more recent works by contemporary African thinkers.

400.04 African Politics
4 credits | T 10:10-12:05 | Moehler, D

This is an introductory course on the politics of Sub-Saharan Africa. The goal is to provide students with historical background and theoretical tools to understand present-day politics on the continent. The first part of the course will survey African political history, touching on: pre-colonial political structures, colonial experiences and legacies, nationalism and independence movements, post-independence optimism and state-building, the authoritarian turn, economic crises, and recent political and economic liberalizations. The second part of the course will examine some contemporary political and economic issues. These include: the effects of political and social identities in Africa (ethnicity, social ties, class, citizenship); the politics of poverty, war, and dysfunction; Africa in the international system; and current attempts to strengthen democracy and rule of law on the continent.

Apply on-line during the pre-enrollment period. Once classes have started, use an add-drop slip; professor’s signature is required.

405 The Postmodern Presidency
4 credits | W 10:10-12:05 | Rubenstein, D

This course will examine the presidencies of Reagan, G.H.W. Bush, Clinton, and G. W. Bush in relation to what scholars have called “the postmodern presidency”. While this term has been utilized by institutionalist students of the presidency as a periodizing hypothesis, our emphasis will be on the work of cultural critics and historians. We will address the slippage between fact and fiction in cinematic and popular representations of the presidency (biography, novels, television). The construction of gender normativity (especially masculinity) will be an attendant subtheme. The postmodern presidency will be read as a site of political as well as cultural contestation. The larger question of this approach to the presidency concerns the relationship between everyday life practices and citizenship as well as the role of national fantasy in American political culture today. (AM)

This course satisfies the seminar requirement.

414 Causes & Consequences of U.S. For. Pol.
4 credits | M 2:30-4:25 | Sanders, E

How can we characterize the twentieth/twenty first century legacy and continuing impact of US foreign policy on the world? What forces—domestic, international, institutional, electoral, economic, cultural, or personal—drive US foreign policy? These are the broad questions to be addressed this semester.

Syllabus

424 Contemporary American Politics
4 credits | T 2:30-4:25 | Shefter, M

This seminar analyzes some major changes in U.S. electoral and group politics in recent decades. Topics to be considered include: partisan realignment, the new conservatism, racial cleavages, "Identity politics," and democratic decline.

427 The Animal
4 credits | TR 1:25-2:40 | Gilgen, P

See GERST 426

430 Biotechnology & Development
4 credits | M 1:25-4:25 | Herring/Thies

Of all the technological solutions to agronomic problems that have been proposed in the last few decades, none has created the level of backlash and controversy as those involving genetic biotechnology. Social protest and activist movements arise from ethical, cultural, religious, economic, environmental and political stances with regard to the use of transgenic technologies, particularly in agricultural development in poor countries. In this course, we will explore the roots of these controversies and follow the logics and economics of their development and deployment. We will try to identify the fundamental underpinnings of various arguments for and against the use of transgenic crops as a tool for agricultural development. Discussions on selected topics and associated directed readings will be led by the course coordinators and invited speakers. Students will be assessed on their participation in discussions and on a written position paper in the subject area.

433 Nationalism(s) in Arab World
4 credits | R (lec 1) 10:10-12:05 | Fahmy, Z

See NES 472

461 Interpreting Race & Racism
4 credits | M 4:00-6:00 | Smith, AM

This seminar is an advanced undergraduate course based on classic and contemporary social and political theory texts. We will explore the historically specific and antagonistic construction of race, and we will focus on the complex and contradictory ways in which racializing formations are defined in terms of class, gender and sexuality. For the spring 2008 version of the course, we will focus on the works of W.E.B. Du Bois. Seminar participants should have already completed Govt 161 or Govt 319 or equivalent courses in other Departments before the course begins. Class size will be limited, and seniors who have satisfied the prerequisite coursework will be given priority. To apply for admission, please contact the instructor.

Syllabus

462 Sexuality and The Law
4 credits | T 10:10-12:05 | Smith, AM

An advanced feminist theory/political theory/ queer theory/legal theory seminar for graduate students and law students. The seminar will deal first with theoretical approaches to sexuality that build on and interrogate the post-structuralist approach that defines sexuality as a social construction, rather than an expression of a-historical instincts. Then we will explore a series of major legal and political issues: the right to privacy with respect to contraception and abortion; the restriction of abortion rights; the exclusion of homosexual sodomy from the practices protected by the right to privacy; the racial regulation of marriage; same-sex marriage; Fineman’s “sexual family” critique of family law; the moral regulation of poor women in early welfare law; the sexual regulation of poor single mothers in contemporary welfare law; the question of suspect class status for lesbians and gay men; and homosexuality and military service. Throughout the course, we will examine the extent to which sexuality is constructed in articulation with gender, class and race differences. Our reading list will include theoretical works (Foucault, Butler, Cohen and Martin), Supreme Court decisions; and critical commentaries by feminist legal theorists. (PT)

Syllabus

464 Theories of Empire
4 credits | T 12:20-2:15 | Maxwell, L

“Empire” has reemerged in recent years as a potent political concept, both in popular political life and debates in contemporary political theory. In this class, we will ask: what kind of domination or form of rule is empire and why is it a continuing trope in human political life? To answer these questions, we will examine the changing concept of empire in ancient Roman, modern, and contemporary political thought. What have theorists been trying to capture when they call something “empire” and how has it changed and shifted in each epoch? We will also consider the entanglement of enlightenment concepts of freedom, equality, and democracy with imperial practices. How have imperial concepts and practices shaped our democratic aspirations to freedom and equality? Did imperialism corrupt Enlightenment aspirations, or were these aspirations haunted by imperialism from within? Readings include texts by ancient Roman historians such as Livy, Tacitus, and Sallust, by modern political thinkers such as Burke, Mill, and Montesquieu, and by 20th century and contemporary theorists such as Hardt & Negri, Hannah Arendt, Richard Tuck, and James Tully.

480 Politics of 70’s Films
4 credits | T 2:30-4:25 | Kirshner, J

The ten years from 1967 to 1976 were an extraordinary time both in the history of American politics and in the history of American film. In the same period that the country was rocked by the Vietnam War, the feminist and civil rights movements, Watergate and economic crisis, the end of Hollywood censorship along with demographic and economic change in the industry ushered in what many call "the last golden age"of American film. In this class we study both film theory and political history to examine these remarkable films and the political context in which they were forged. The goal of the course is to take seriously both the films and their politics. (AM or PT)

Syllabus

495 Honors: Research & Writing
4 credits | TBA | Katzenstein, M

Limited to students who have completed GOVT 494, Honors Thesis Program.

602 Methods of Political Analysis II
4 credits | R 4:30-6:55 | Enns, P

This course will introduce students to some basic methods for conducting quantitative analyses in political science. After taking this course, students will be able to read and critique political science research that uses basic statistical analyses as well as be able to use basic statistical techniques, such as multiple regression analysis, in their own research. The course will begin with basic probability theory and proceed to statistical analysis of political data.

603 Field Seminar in American Politics
4 credits | T 6:00-8:00 | Sanders, E

The major issues, approaches, and institutions of American government and the various subfields of American politics are introduced. The focus is on both substantive information and theoretical analysis. (AM)

Syllabus

607 Field Sem in Pol Thought
4 credits | W 2:30-4:25 | Kramnick, I

A survey of the early modern political theory canon, emphasizing texts and writers from the Seventeeth and Eighteenth centuries. (PT)

613 The Politics of Inequality
4 credits | W 10:10-12:05 | Mettler, S

In the mid-20th century United States, egalitarianism seemed to be on the rise: the ranks of the middle class swelled and policymakers eradicated laws that had long sanctioned racial and gender hierarchies. Then, beginning in 1973 and to the present, economic inequality escalated, stratifying Americans by income and wealth and reinforcing old cleavages that the civil rights and feminist movements had sought to overcome. This course investigates how American politics has influenced and been shaped by these developments. We will examine trends across the political system, investigating aspects of political voice, including political participation and public opinion; political institutions, including Congress, political parties, and interest groups; and public policy, considering the extent to which it ameliorates or fosters inequality. The course offers a broad survey of important literature in the field of American politics.

614 Causes & Consequences of U.S. Foreign Policy
4 credits | M 5:00-7:00 | Sanders, E

How can we characterize the twentieth/twenty first century legacy and continuing impact of US foreign policy on the world? What forces-- domestic, international, institutional, electoral, economic, cultural, or personal--drive US foreign policy? These are the broad questions to be addressed this semester.

Syllabus

629 Contemporary American Politics
4 credits | T 2:30-4:25 | Shefter, M

This seminar analyzes some major changes in U.S. electoral and group politics in recent decades. Topics to be considered include: partisan realignment, the new conservatism, racial cleavages, "Identity politics," and democratic decline.

635 Field Seminar in Comparative Politics
4 credits | F 10:10-1:10 | Anderson, C

This course provides an introduction to comparative politics, introducing students to classic works as well as major recent contributions to the field. Topics to be covered include the comparative method, democratic institutions, political culture, modernization theory, ethnicity, economic development and contentious politics. The course will require extensive reading and assignments will include several review papers. (CO)

639 Comparative Pol. Participation
4 credits | W 2:00-4:25 | Moehler, D

This course is concerned with understanding how and under what conditions citizens seek to influence political elites through use, expansion, circumvention or subversion of existing channels of political participation. Cases from a variety of institutional contexts over time will be used to examine how mediating institutions diminish and/or exacerbate social inequalities in the exercise of political voice. We will consider how observations from other cultural contexts challenge dominant paradigms within American political science that shape how we think about political participation.

652 Methods for Field Research
4 credits | M 2:30-4:25 | Patel, D

This course provides an introduction to methodological and practical aspects of using various field methods to develop and test theory. Covered topics include ethics and human subject issues, case selection, ethnography, participant observation, interviewing, survey methods, and field experiments. Students will develop field research strategies for their own projects. The course assumes a grasp of research design at the graduate level.

667 Derrida & Phil of Hospitality
4 credits | M 12:20-2:15 | Rubenstein, D & Shaffer, L

Beginning with an examination of hospitality in authors such as Foucault and Levinas and other text such as the Bible, we focus on Derrida’s writings on hospitality from the 1990’s until his death. Derrida readings would include Of Hospitality, Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness, "’Eating Well’ or the Calculation of the Subject," and Monolinguism of the Other. Other readings would include works by contemporary readers, Seyla Benhabib, Bonnie Honig, Tracy McNulty and James Davidson’s Courtesan and Fishcakes. These theoretical texts would be put in tension with practitioners such as Danny Meyers’ Setting the Table, the biography of EM Statler and films such as Stephen Frears "Dirty Pretty Thing.

678 Theories of Empire
4 credits | T 12:20-2:15 | Maxwell, L

“Empire” has reemerged in recent years as a potent political concept, both in popular political life and debates in contemporary political theory. In this class, we will ask: what kind of domination or form of rule is empire and why is it a continuing trope in human political life? To answer these questions, we will examine the changing concept of empire in ancient Roman, modern, and contemporary political thought. What have theorists been trying to capture when they call something “empire” and how has it changed and shifted in each epoch? We will also consider the entanglement of enlightenment concepts of freedom, equality, and democracy with imperial practices. How have imperial concepts and practices shaped our democratic aspirations to freedom and equality? Did imperialism corrupt Enlightenment aspirations, or were these aspirations haunted by imperialism from within? Readings include texts by ancient Roman historians such as Livy, Tacitus, and Sallust, by modern political thinkers such as Burke, Mill, and Montesquieu, and by 20th century and contemporary theorists such as Hardt & Negri, Hannah Arendt, Richard Tuck, and James Tully.

692 The Administration of Agriculture and Rural Development
4 credits | M 2:30-5:00 | Uphoff, N./ Tucker

The political, bureaucratic, economic, and technical environments of administration for agricultural and rural development; the various functions involved in administration (personnel managment, planning, budgeting, economic analysis, information systems); several major tasks (research, extension services, and infrastructure development); and specific problems of integrating activities, interfacing with rural populations, and utilizing external assistance. Intended primarily for persons who expect to have some future responsibilities in agricultural or rural development administration and Third World countries.

699 CPAS Weekly Colloquium
1 credit | R 4:30-6:00 | Lowi, T., et. al.

Colloquium is the weekly seminar series hosted by the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA). It is also a required, one-credit course for al CIPA Fellows, and is graded S/U based on attendance. The colloquium series is a collaborative effort between the CIPA Colloquium Committee and the faculty and staff of CIPA. While each CIPA Fellow must exhibit competency in many different areas in order to graduate, it is impossible to gain full exposure to the variety of policy issues that students may be confronted with as a practicing policy professional. Thus, the weekly colloquium series is structured to provide students with an opportunity to augment their education in a breadth of policy areas. The administration and faculty of CIPA consider the CIPA Colloquium Series to be an essential aspect of professional development, and as such, attendance is expected of CIPA Fellows.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 600 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor.

762 Sexuality and The Law
4 credits | T 10:10-12:05 | Smith, AM

An advanced feminist theory/political theory/ queer theory/legal theory seminar for graduate students and law students. The seminar will deal first with theoretical approaches to sexuality that build on and interrogate the post-structuralist approach that defines sexuality as a social construction, rather than an expression of a-historical instincts. Then we will explore a series of major legal and political issues: the right to privacy with respect to contraception and abortion; the restriction of abortion rights; the exclusion of homosexual sodomy from the practices protected by the right to privacy; the racial regulation of marriage; same-sex marriage; Fineman’s "sexual family" critique of family law; the moral regulation of poor women in early welfare law; the sexual regulation of poor single mothers in contemporary welfare law; the question of suspect class status for lesbians and gay men; and homosexuality and military service. Throughout the course, we will examine the extent to which sexuality is constructed in articulation with gender, class and race differences. Our reading list will include theoretical works (Foucault, Butler, Cohen and Martin), Supreme Court decisions; and critical commentaries by feminist legal theorists. (PT)

Syllabus

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