Courses

Teaching students how to think and to write rigorously and creatively about issues of public life

Spring 2010

Course Index & Descriptions

Introductory Courses
Note: Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class.
1313 Introduction to Comparative Government
1615 Introduction to Political Philosophy.
Major Seminars
Note: Apply on-line during the pre-enrollment period. Once classes have started, use an add/drop slip; professor’s signature is required.
4000.01 Dictators/Democrats in Modern Latin America
4000.02 How Do You Know That?
4000.03 Political Participation in Europe
Other Major Seminar Choices
4241 Contemporary American Politics
4374 States & Societies Middle East
4715 Critical Reason, The Basics
4817 International Law and Conflict
4827 Unifying While Integrating: China and the World
American Government and Institutions
3102 Topics in Law & Legal Ethics
3181 The U.S. Congress
3281 Constitutional Politics
Comparative Politics
3293 Comparative Politics of Latin America
3437 Politics of the European Union
3463 Modern Japanese Politics
International Relations
2827 China and the World
3847 Weapons of Mass Destruction
3944 Comparative Foreign Policy
Political Theory
3735 Political Freedom
Honors Courses
4959 Honors: Research & Writing
Methods
6029 Methods of Political Analysis II.
Graduate Seminars
Note: Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor.
6053 Compa Meth in Int’l & Comp Pol
6075 Field Seminar in Political Thought
6132 The Politics of Inequality
6202 Political Culture
6283 Political Participation in Europe
6291 Contemporary American Politics
6324 Proseminar in Chinese Politics
6461 Public Opinion
6474 States & Societies Middle East
6705 Modern Social Theory II
6775 Language & Politics
6827 Unifying While Integrating: China and the World
6897 International Security
7074 Game Theory 2: Advanced Topics
Cross-listed courses
2605 Social and Political Philosophy
2729 Origins of the Social
3063 Society and Party Politics
3705 Political Theory and Cinema
3977 The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
4748 Link, Network, Nexu
4888 Normative Issues in IR
6413 Comparative Labor Movements: Europe and US
6927 Planning & Management of Agriculture & Rural Development

1313 Introduction to Comparative Government and Politics
3 credits | TR 10:10-11:25 | Roberts, K

Explores political institutions and processes in major regions of the world–Western and Eastern Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. Students are introduced to comparative methods of political analysis, and they develop conceptual and theoretical tools to analyze political issues like democratization, authoritarianism, revolution, ethnic conflict, and the political economy of development.

Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class.

Syllabus

1615 Introduction to Political Philosophy
3 credits | TR 1:25-2:40 | Kramnick, I

A survey of the development of Western political theory from Plato to the present. Readings from the works of the major theorists. An examination of the relevance of their ideas to contemporary politics.

Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class.

Syllabus

4000.01 Dictators/Democrats in Modern Latin America
4 credits | W 10:10-12:05 | Morrison, K

This course has two principal goals. The first and foremost goal is to provide an introduction to the study of dictatorships and democracies in political science. By the end of the course, students should be able to answer the following questions in thoughtful and informed ways: What are the important differences between dictatorships and democracies? How do political scientists think of causality, and what do they mean by a “theory”? What causes democracies or dictatorships to come into existence? What effects do democracies and dictatorships have with regard to outcomes we may care about, such as economic development, poverty, and inequality? The second goal of the course is to introduce students to the recent political history of Latin America. The study of the history of Latin America will be instrumental, in the sense that it will be used to analyze the theories of dictatorships and democracies under study.

Apply on-line during the pre-enrollment period. Once classes have started, use an add-drop slip; professor’s signature is required.

4000.02 How Do You Know That?
4 credits | M 2:00-4:25 | Way, C

Does allowing citizens to carry concealed weapons reduce violent crime? Do affirmative action policies at law schools cause black students to fail the bar? Does the death penalty deter murders? Do micro-finance policies make the poor better off? Do the militaries of democracies fight better in the field than those of non-democracies? Answering questions like these about the effects of public policy implies cause and effect knowledge: if we implement policy X, we will get effect Y. But on what evidence should answers to questions like these rest? How do you know the answer, or can you? Providing robust answers to cause-and effect questions in a (mostly) non-experimental field like political science is devilishly difficult. In this course, we will learn some of the pitfalls that make it so hard to evaluate evidence in the public policy realm, how to judge the quality of evidence cited in the media, and how to ask the right questions to get the best possible evidence. We’ll do so by working through the evidence supporting “yes” or “no” answers to the questions listed above.

Apply on-line during the pre-enrollment period. Once classes have started, use an add-drop slip; professor’s signature is required.

4000.03 Political Participation in Europe
4 credits | W 2:30-4:25 | Zittel, T

Citizen participation is declining across many European democracies, as it is in much of the western world. Voting turnout is down; membership of political parties is sliding; trade Union membership has fallen by more than a third since 1980. Perhaps the most worrying trend is the lower rates of civic engagement, interest, and knowledge among the youngest age cohort of adults. This class addresses these issues from a comparative perspective by asking the following five key questions: 1) Which types of participation matter in democracies, and why?; How do European citizens participate, and why? Do European democracies differ in the level and quality of political participation, and why? How important are political institutions for the quantity and quality of political participation? What can be done about the general decline in political participation? (CO)

Apply on-line during the pre-enrollment period. Once classes have started, use an add-drop slip; professor’s signature is required.

4241 Contemporary American Politics
4 credits | T 2:30-4:25 | Shefter, M

This seminar analyzes some major changes in U.S. electoral and group politics in recent decades. Topics to be considered include: partisan realignment, the new conservatism, racial cleavages, “Identity politics,” and democratic decline.

4374 States & Societies Middle East
4 credits | W 2:00-4:25 | Patel, D

This seminar surveys research approaches and puzzles in contemporary Middle Eastern politics. Students will be introduced to some of the major arguments, hypotheses and debates in the literature. Topics to be considered include: the nature and legacies of colonialism, state-building and the character of contemporary Middle Eastern regimes, the political economy of oil, economic crises, elections and political ‘liberalization,’ and the role of Islamism in political, social, and economic life. The seminar is designed principally for graduate students who focus their research on the Middle East and advanced undergraduates who have taken courses in Middle Eastern politics or history.

4715 Critical Reason, The Basics
4 credits | W 10:10-12:05 | Buck-Morss, S

This course deals with basic concepts and methods of Critical Theory from Kant to Adorno. Lectures will consider philosophy from the perspective of the political, demonstrating how autonomy, freedom, democracy, and law are approached by the following: critical reason, dialectics, materialist epistemology, and the socio-logics of non-identity. Students will tackle difficult primary texts in this tradition, with the goal of enhancing their own critical capacities to analyze political, social and economic life. We will read texts by Kant, Hegel, Marcuse (on Marx), and Adorno (PT)

4817 International Law and Conflict
4 credits | W 10:10-12:05 | Kreps, S

The purpose of this seminar is to study the relationship between international law, politics, and conflict. Among other questions, this course asks why states obligate themselves to international treaties, when and why they comply with the treaties they sign, how international organizations enforce treaties, and whether democracies are more or less compliant with international law than other regime types. Although the course generally explores these questions of international law governing armed conflict, it also considers issues of human rights, proliferation, and alliances. (IR)

4827 Unifying While Integrating: China and the World
4 credits | T 10:10-12:05 | Carlson, A

This seminar is intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system during the 1980s and 1990s. In it emphasis will be placed upon the inter-related, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy. We will especially concentrate on ongoing controversies over the rise of Chinese nationalism and the persistence of “minority nationalism” in many regions within China. (IR)

3102 Topics in Law & Legal Ethics
4 credits | M 10:10-12:05 | Grumbach, C

This seminar explores some of the complex and contentious ethical dilemmas that lawyers must navigate and reconcile in legal practice. May a lawyer ever permit a client to commit perjury? Should a lawyer use bias or prejudice if it will help win the case? May counsel hire an investigator to engage in subterfuge with a potential witness? What should a lawyer do if their personal moral beliefs conflict with a professional obligation? Who makes these decisions any way, the lawyer or the client? As a means of analyzing these and other questions, we will focus on two very different areas of law practice: criminal law (both the defense and prosecution) and toxic torts (in the form of a class action lawsuit involving chemical contamination). First, we will read and discuss some of the court decisions and law review articles with which any legal ethicist should be familiar. Then, using real dilemmas and simulations, we will test different philosophical perspectives and theoretical approaches. (AM)

3181 The U.S. Congress
4 credits | MWF 2:30-3:20 | Shefter, M.

The role of Congress in the American political system. Topics to be discussed: the political setting within which Congress operates, the structure of Congress, the salient features of the legislative process, and recent congressional behavior in a number of policy areas.

3281 Constitutional Politics
4 credits | MW 8:40-9:55 | Chutkow, D

The course investigates the role of the Supreme Court in American politics and government. It traces the historical development of constitutional doctrine and the Court's institutional role in government. Discussed are major constitutional law decisions, their political contexts, and the social and behavioral factors that affect federal court jurisprudence.

3293 Comp. Politics of Latin America
4 credits | TR 1:25-2:40 | Flores-Macias, G

This course is designed as an introduction to political, economic, and social issues in 20th century Latin America. Topics are organized chronologically, beginning with the process of industrialization and incorporation of the popular sectors in the 1930s and 1940s, and ending with the recent rise of the left to power in the region. Among the main topics covered are populism and corporatism, dependency theory and import-substitution industrialization, revolutions, the breakdown of democracy, military rule, democratic transitions, debt crisis and market reforms, social movements, and migration. Throughout the semester, we will draw on examples from the entire region, but the course will focus on six main countries, namely Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and Venezuela. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is not required.

3437 Politics of the European Union
4 credits | TR 11:40-12:55 | Zittel, T

Together with the US, China, and Russia, the European Union is a major player in world politics. Its political system is however still in the making. Europeans themselves are divided about the question whether the EU is a new type of state, or whether it simply resembles a supranational regime made up of still sovereign nation states. This course provides an overview of European Union institutions and policymaking processes. It analyzes the various roles of EU institutions and advisory bodies. It examines the ways in which interest groups, political parties and public opinion affect decision-making in the Union. It explains and traces the implications of the diversity of policymaking processes that characterize EU decision-making. Finally, the course engages in debates about the “democratic deficit” in Europe and considers whether meaningful action can be taken to increase legitimacy. Throughout the course we will reflect on parallels with the American political system. (CO)

3463 Modern Japanese Politics
4 credits | TR 2:55-4:10 | Martin, S

In the 1980s, Japan was number one. The consolidation of its postwar democracy and rapid economic growth offered an alternative political economic model for emerging democracies. By the 1990s, the economic bubble burst and provided momentum for reforming the Japanese way of doing politics. Whereas the U.S. sought to learn from Japan’s success in the 1980s, we now seek to apply lessens from its failures to politically resolving our own economic crisis. This course examines the rise and fall of the “1955 System” and Japan’s ongoing struggle to reach a new political equilibrium through reforms aimed at producing a better democracy.

2827 China and the World
3 credits | MW 8:40-9:55 | Carlson, A

In this course we study the dramatic rise of China through reviewing major developments in contemporary Chinese foreign policy since the establishment of the People's Republic of China (PRC), and more specifically concentrating on major developments in Chinese foreign policy during the 1980s and 1990s. Such a wide-ranging survey of Chinese foreign policy will involve not only a consideration of the evolution of China's relations with its major bilateral partners, but also an investigation of how China has defined its broader relationship with the international system. In addition, students will be asked to consider which causal factors have been of primary importance in motivating Chinese behavior. (IR)

3847 Weapons of Mass Destruction
4 credits | TR 2:55-4:10 | Kreps, S & Lewis, G

The 20th and early 21st centuries have been profoundly affected by the development of extremely destructive, technology-based weapons, often (and sometimes wrongly) lumped together under the term “weapons of mass destruction.” This course will examine topics such as the physics, technology, ethics, and politics of nuclear weapons. In addition, the course will explore the nuclear arms race, efforts to restrain it via arms control, important concepts and strategies including nuclear deterrence, and recent and current issues associated with nuclear proliferation. Similarly, the technology, past and future potential uses, and prospects for preventing future use of biological, chemical, and radiological weapons will be covered. Finally, the delivery systems that enable the use of many of the above weapons will also be covered, ranging from the mass and fire bombings of World War II, to the massive missile arsenals of the Cold War, and to current issues such as the deployment and effectiveness of missile defenses.

3944 Comparative Foreign Policy
4 credits | TR 10:10-11:25 | Weeks, J

This course explores the sources of differences in foreign policy processes and outcomes across states. One school of thought holds that different domestic political institutions lead to differences in states’ foreign policies. Another argues that domestic and international norms and ideas are the crucial determinants of states’ international behavior. A third school of thought holds that states’ relative power and the constraints of anarchy are most important for understanding foreign policy. We will start by evaluating competing explanations for a number of general issues in foreign policy, including international war, humanitarian intervention, and foreign economic aid. We will then build on this general understanding with more specific inquiries into the foreign policies of individual states, including the U.S., China, Russia, and others. Students will be asked to think critically about the logic of competing arguments, as well as the strength of the evidence supporting different explanations for state behavior.

3735 Political Freedom
4 credits | TR 11:40-12:55 | Frank, J

This course will explore dilemmas surrounding the concept and practice of political freedom. We will begin with an examination of traditional philosophical approaches to this issue—such as debates about free will and determinism, agency and structure, and negative and positive liberty—but we will primarily focus on how these traditional rubrics obscure our understanding of the particularity of political freedom. In order to better grasp this particularity we will explore diverse theoretical, literary, and social scientific works. Authors read may include Sophocles, Augustine, Dostoevsky, Plato, Arendt, Emerson, Dewey, Foucault, Melville, Berlin, Gaventa, and Scott.

4959 Honors: Research & Writing
4 credits | TBA | Sanders, E

Limited to students who have completed GOVT 4949, Honors Thesis Program.

6029 Methods of Political Analysis II
4 credits | TR 11:40-12:25 | Enns, P

This course includes an introduction to matrix algebra, statistical modeling, and a detailed study of OLS regression including assumptions and diagnostics.

6053 Compa. Meth in Int’l & Comp Pol
4 credits | W 10:10-12:35 | Patel, D

An in-depth, graduate-level introduction to qualitative and comparative methods of political analysis, with special emphasis on the application of these methods in comparative and international politics. Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will explore strategies for concept formation, theory construction, and theory testing, using the craft and tools of comparative political analysis.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6075 Field Sem in Political Thought
4 credits | W 2:30-4:25 | Kramnick, I

The topic for the field seminar this year will be early modern western political thought, crucial theory texts that defined the canon in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth centuries. Seniors may take this seminar with the permission of the professor. (PT)

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6132 The Politics of Inequality
4 credits | W 10:10-12:05 | Mettler, S

In the mid-twentieth century United States, egalitarianism seemed to be on the rise as the ranks of the middle class swelled and policymakers eradicated laws that had long sanctioned racial and gender hierarchies. Then, beginning in 1973, economic inequality escalated and grew sharply for 35 years, only tapering during the current recession. Over this period, it stratified Americans by income and wealth, and reinforced old divisions of race and gender. How have these developments transformed American politics, and vice versa? We will examine trends across the political system, investigating aspects of political voice, including political participation and public opinion; political institutions, including Congress, political parties, and interest groups; and public policy, considering the extent to which it ameliorates or fosters inequality. The course offers a broad survey of important literature in the field of American politics. Throughout, we will give some attention to the prospects for modification of these trends during the Obama Administration.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6202 Political Culture
4 credits | T 5:00-7:00 | Bensel, R

This course will explore the relationship between popular belief, political action, and the institutional deployment of social power. The class will be roughly divided in three parts, opening with a discussion of how the material world influences the culture of a society. The middle section will connect culture to political ideology, including symbolism and the construction of group identity. The last part of the course will consider ways in which cultural symbols and ideology can be manipulated in order to legitimate government authority. We will then, coming full circle, trace how political regimes can influence the social practices from which culture originates.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6283 Pol. Participation in Europe
4 credits | W 2:30-4:25 | Zittel, T

Citizen participation is declining across many European democracies, as it is in much of the western world. Voting turnout is down; membership of political parties is sliding; trade Union membership has fallen by more than a third since 1980. Perhaps the most worrying trend is the lower rates of civic engagement, interest, and knowledge among the youngest age cohort of adults. This class addresses these issues from a comparative perspective by asking the following five key questions: 1) Which types of participation matter in democracies, and why?; How do European citizens participate, and why? Do European democracies differ in the level and quality of political participation, and why? How important are political institutions for the quantity and quality of political participation? What can be done about the general decline in political participation? (CO)

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6291 Contemporary American Politics
4 credits | T 2:30-4:25 | Shefter, M

This seminar analyzes some major changes in U.S. electoral and group politics in recent decades. Topics to be considered include: partisan realignment, the new conservatism, racial cleavages, “Identity politics,” and democratic decline.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6324 Proseminar in Chinese Politics
4 credits | T 1:25-4:25 | Mertha, A

This proseminar in Chinese politics has three goals. The first is to analyze Chinese politics from several dimensions (elite politics, Center-local relations, institutions, state and society, the military, etc.). The second is to situate China within the larger context of comparative politics more generally: what we can learn about China by leveraging insights from the subfield of comparative politics (the anthropology of the state, institutions, social movements, etc.) and vice versa? The third goal is to trace the evolution of the study of China from 1950s Kremlinology to the present day field-research continuously unfolding, and in real time, from all over China.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6461 Public Opinion
4 credits | M 10:10-1:10 | Enns, P

This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. We will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior, although we will touch on participation and voting only in passing. The primary focus will be on American public opinion, although there will be some attention to comparative work. In addition to empirical research on the antecedents of opinion and its role in the larger political system, we will consider normative work on the meaning and measurement of opinion and on its role in democratic politics. (AM)

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6474 States & Societies Middle East
4 credits | W 2:00-4:25 | Patel, D

This seminar surveys research approaches and puzzles in contemporary Middle Eastern politics. Students will be introduced to some of the major arguments, hypotheses and debates in the literature. Topics to be considered include: the nature and legacies of colonialism, state-building and the character of contemporary Middle Eastern regimes, the political economy of oil, economic crises, elections and political ‘liberalization,’ and the role of Islamism in political, social, and economic life. The seminar is designed principally for graduate students who focus their research on the Middle East and advanced undergraduates who have taken courses in Middle Eastern politics or history.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6705 Modern Social Theory II
4 credits | M 7:00pm-9:00pm | Buck-Morss, S

Topics vary. The readings for spring 2010 will focus on the Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School and the materialist phenomenology of Walter Benjamin.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6775 Language & Politics
4 credits | M 2:30-4:25 | Frank, J

This course explores the “linguistic turn” of recent political theory alongside canonical debates over the political and epistemological consequences of different philosophies of language. Writers examined will include Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Austin, Derrida, Butler, and Cavell.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6827 Unifying While Integrating: China and the World
4 credits | T 10:10-12:05 | Carlson, A

This seminar is intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system during the 1980s and 1990s. In it emphasis will be placed upon the inter-related, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy. We will especially concentrate on ongoing controversies over the rise of Chinese nationalism and the persistence of “minority nationalism” in many regions within China. (IR)

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

6897 International Security
4 credits | M 7:30-10:30 | Weeks, J

This course will examine a variety of international relations theories in studying a broad range of security issues, including the causes of war, alliance formation, balance-of-power politics, security regimes, nuclear and conventional deterrence, the democratic peace, military strategy, international terrorism, and domestic constraints on the use of force. We will use a variety of theoretical perspective to investigate these and other issues, paying particular attention to evaluating the theoretical arguments with both historical and systematic evidence. (IR)

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

7074 Game Theory 2: Advanced Topics
4 credits | M 2:00-4:25 | Morrison, K

This is the second of two graduate courses on game theory in the government department. In the first half of this course, we will focus on advanced topics, including coalitional games, games of imperfect information, evolutionary games, and bargaining. The second half of the course will be focused on helping students develop their own models, using the techniques learned in both of the courses.

Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor

2605 Social and Political Philosophy
4 credits | MW 3:35-4:25 | Taylor, E

This course will examine key issues in social and political philosophy. Topics may include the legitimacy of the state; political obligation; the nature and demands of justice; equality; liberty and autonomy. Selected readings may be drawn from historical as well as contemporary sources.

2729 Origins of the Social
4 credits | TR 2:55-4:10 | Robcis, C

For description, see HIST 2330.

3063 Society and Party Politics
4 credits | TR 2:55-4:10 | Van Morgan, S

This course will focus on the role that society plays in the emergence and functioning of political parties. In addition to investigating different types of party systems, the societal roots of political parties, and the influence of institutions on electoral politics, the course will also examine contemporary debates, such as the relationship between culture and electoral behavior. Case studies will be drawn from a number of Western and non-Western democracies.

3705 Political Theory and Cinema
4 credits | TR 10:10-11:25 | Waite, G

An introduction (without prerequisites) to fundamental problems of current political theory, filmmaking, and film analysis, along with their interrelationship. Particular emphasis on comparing and contrasting European and alternative cinema with Hollywood in terms of post-Marxist, psychoanalytic, postmodernist, and postcolonial types of interpretation. Filmmakers/theorists might include: David Cronenberg, Michael Curtiz, Kathryn Bigelow, Gilles Deleuze, Rainer Fassbinder, John Ford, Jean-Luc Godard, Marleen Gorris, Werner Herzog, Alfred Hitchcock, Allen & Albert Hughes, Stanley Kubrick, Fredric Jameson, Chris Marker, Pier-Paolo Pasolini, Gillo Pontecorvo, Robert Ray, Martin Scorsese, Ridley Scott, Oliver Stone, George Romero, Steven Shaviro, Kidlat Tahimik, Maurizio Viano, Slavoj Zizek. Although this is a lecture course, there will be ample time for class discussions.

3977 The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
4 credits | TR 10:10-11:25 | Brann, R

For description, see NES 3697.

4748 Link, Network, Nexu
4 credits | R 2:30-4:25 | Massumi, B

This course will consider a related constellation of philosophical conceptions of locality and globality, connection and continuity, which challenge common assumptions underlying presentday notions of the network. The philosophical paradigms to be examined include the concepts of the ”nexus“ and “extensive continuum” (A.N.Whitehead), “non-local linkage” and “transspatiality” (Raymond Ruyer), “intensity” and “multiplicity” (Bergson), “reticulation" (Gilbert Simondon), and "smooth space” (Deleuze/Guattari). These concepts will be deployed and their implications explored through a consideration of current issues, such as the military doctrine of “network-centric warfare” and network-oriented social-movement politics.

4888 Normative Issues in IR
4 credits | R 2:30-4:25 | Miller, R

Spring 2010 topic: War and International Relations

6413 Comparative Labor Movements: Europe and US
4 credits | M 7:00-10:00 | L. Turner

This advanced course examines labor union revitalization strategies in the United States and Europe in the context of todays global economy. The practical focus is on union strategies: recent innovations, successes and failures, and current debates within the labor movement. This is a limited enrollment seminar for motivated juniors and seniors, with graduate students also welcome. The essential course requirement is to complete the assigned reading and preparation prior to each meeting and to be ready for discussion. A successful seminar requires active rather than passive reading on the part of all participants; this means that everyone reads, takes notes, and thinks in advance of questions, arguments, and points for discussion based on the readings. Please come prepared each week for discussion and argument based on the readings for that week.

6927 Planning & Management of Agriculture & Rural Development
4 credits | M 2:30-5:00 | Uphoff, N.T. and Tucker, T.W.

An intercollege course designed to provide graduate students with a multidisciplinary perspective on the administration of agricultural and rural development activities in developing countries. The course is oriented to students in agricultural or social sciences who may have administrative responsibilities during their professional careers.

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