Courses

Teaching students how to think and to write rigorously and creatively about issues of public life

Spring 2011

Course Index & Descriptions

Introductory Courses
Note: Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class.
1111 Introduction to American Government and Politics
1313 Intro to Comparative Government and Politics
Major Seminars
Note: Apply on-line during the pre-enrollment period. Once classes have started, use an add/drop slip; professor’s signature is required.
4000.01 State and Society in China
4000.02 Politics of Punishment: Theory and Practice
4000.03 The Presidency and Visual Culture
Other Major Seminar Choices
4061 Politics of Slow-Moving Crises
4112 The Politics of Change
4241 Contemporary American Politics
4264 Social Movements in Latin America
4435 Education, Social Justice, and the Law
4827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
American Government and Institutions
3021 Social Movements in American Politics
3181 The U.S. Congress
3281 Constitutional Politics: The US Supreme Court
4281 Government and Public Policy (Not a Senior Seminar)
Comparative Politics
3313 Middle Eastern Politics
3443 Southeast Asian Politics
4303 GMO Debate: Science and Society (Not a Senior Seminar)
International Relations
2827 China and the World
3937 Introduction to Peace & Conflict Studies
4809 Politics of 70’s Films (Not a Senior Seminar)
Political Theory
3635 Human Rights and Global Justice
Honors Courses
4959 Honors: Research & Writing
Methods
6029 Methods of Political Analysis II
Graduate Seminars
Note: Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor.
6031 Field Seminar in American Politics
6053 Comparative Methods in International & Comparative Politics
6067 Field Seminar in International Relations
6171 Politics of Public Policy
6264 Social Movements in Latin America
6291 Contemporary American Politics
6494 Agrarian Political Economy
6635 Education, Social Justice, and the Law
6665 Media Theory
6827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
6897 International Security
7074 Game Theory 2: Advanced Topics
7281 Government and Public Policy
Cross-listed courses
2747 History of Modern Mideast 19-20th Century
2947 Global Thinking
3063 Society and Party Politics
3259 European Union and Its Social Model
3324 Comp Labor Movements in Europe and North America
3745 19th and 20th Century European Thought
4655 Social and Political Philosophy
4862 Classics and Early America
6423 Feminist Methodology
6656 Social and Political Philosophy
6746 Kant’s Political Reason
6927 Planning and Management of Agriculture and Rural Development

1111 Introduction to American Government and Politics
4cr | TR 2:55-4:10 | Lowi, T

An introduction to government through the American experience. Concentrates on analysis of the institutions of government and politics as mechanisms of social control.

1313 Intro to Comparative Government and Politics
4cr | TR 10:10-11:25 | Anderson, C

Explores political institutions and processes in major regions of the world– Western and Eastern Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. Students are introduced to comparative methods of political analysis, and they develop conceptual and theoretical tools to analyze political issues like democratization, authoritarianism, revolution, ethnic conflict, and the political economy of development.

2747 History of Modern Mideast 19-20th Century
3cr | MW 1:25-2:15 | Fahmy, Z

For description see NES 2674

2827 China and the World
3cr | MW 8:40-9:55 | Carlson, A

In this course we study the dramatic rise of China through reviewing major developments in contemporary Chinese foreign policy since the establishment of the People's Republic of China (PRC), and more specifically concentrating on major developments in Chinese foreign policy during the 1980s and 1990s. Such a wide-ranging survey of Chinese foreign policy will involve not only a consideration of the evolution of China’s relations with its major bilateral partners, but also an investigation of how China has defined its broader relationship with the international system. In addition, students will be asked to consider which causal factors have been of primary importance in motivating Chinese behavior. (IR)

2947 Global Thinking
4cr | MW 2:55-4:10 | Miller, R

For description see PHIL 1940

3021 Social Movements in American Politics
4cr | TR 11:40-12:55 | Sanders, E

Analyzing a variety of movements from the late 19th century to the present, this course seeks answers to the following questions: What social and political conditions gave rise to these movements? What determined success or failure (and how should those terms be defined)? How do social movements affect political processes and institutions (and vise-versa)? What is their legacy in politics and in patterns of social interaction? The major movements analyzed are populism; progressivism; labor; socialism; women’s suffrage, the contemporary gender equality movement; protest movements of the 1930’s; civil rights; SDS and antiwar movements of the 60s; environmentalism; the 1980’s anti-nuclear (weapons) movement; gay rights; and the new religious right. Some theoretical works will be used, but most of our theoretical explorations will be inductively derived, from studies of actual movements and the difficulties they faced. (AM)

3063 Society and Party Politics
4cr | MW 8:40-9:55 | Van Morgan, S

For description see SOC 3070

3181 The U.S. Congress
4cr | MWF 2:30-3:20 | Shefter, M

The role of Congress in the American political system. Topics to be discussed: the political setting within which Congress operates, the structure of Congress, the salient features of the legislative process, and recent congressional behavior in a number of policy areas.

3259 European Union and Its Social Model
4cr | MW 10:10-11:25 | Jacobi, O

For description see ILRIC 3320

3281 Constitutional Politics: The US Supreme Court
4cr | MW 8:40-9:55 | Chutkow, D

The course investigates the role of the Supreme Court in American politics and government. It traces the historical development of constitutional doctrine and the Court’s institutional role in government. Discussed are major constitutional law decisions, their political contexts, and the social and behavioral factors that affect federal court jurisprudence.

3313 Middle Eastern Politics
4cr | TR 11:40-12:55 | Patel, D

This course provides an introduction to contemporary Middle Eastern politics. The goal is to provide students with historical background and theoretical tools to answer the following core questions: (1) Why do authoritarian political systems persist in the Middle East more than they do elsewhere? (2) Why have Islamist groups become prominent opposition forces in and across some countries? (3) Why do some Middle Eastern countries suffer from high levels of political violence while others are spared? (4) What accounts for the region’s current economic underdevelopment? (5) Would the adoption of Western-style political institutions improve governance and stability in the region? The course explicitly compares outcomes and explanations within the region, between the region and other world areas, and over time.

3324 Comparative Labor Movements in Europe and North America
2cr | T 7:00-10:00 | Turner, L

For description see ILRIC 4305

3745 19th and 20th Century European Thought
4cr | MW 2:55-4:10 | Kosch, M

For description see PHIL 2240

3443 Southeast Asian Politics
4cr | TR 2:55-4:10 | Pepinsky, T

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most diverse and fascinating regions. This course will survey the political development of modern Southeast Asia, from the colonial period through today, focusing on Burma, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. We will seek to understand variation across time, across countries, and within countries on topics such as economic development, state-building, democratization, corruption, ethnic relations, and civil violence.

3635 Human Rights and Global Justice
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Smith, AM

In this course, we will move between the study of a) general concepts of justice and human rights: liberty rights; political rights; and social rights (such as the right to education); b) concrete problems pertaining to the interpretation of international human rights agreements and US constitutional law; and c) contemporary moral/legal controversies, including the legal vulnerability of the homeless and unauthorized immigrant children, and our moral duties towards them; the legal status of enhanced interrogation techniques, including torture; the normative debates on multiculturalism, women’s rights, and cosmopolitanism; and the moral obligations of citizens in the developed world with respect to the least advantaged in the developing countries.

3937 Introduction to Peace & Conflict Studies
4cr | TR 10:10-11:25 | Kreps, S

This course serves as an introduction to the study of war, peace, and peacemaking. We will study different theories of peace and war from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The course will cover definitions of peace and war, causes of conflict, and modes of conflict prevention and resolution. The concepts will be applied to a range of historical and current conflicts. Students will prepare analyses of specific conflicts or instances of peacemaking for class presentation.

4000.01 State and Society in China
4cr | W 4:45-6:40 | Mertha, A

This course looks at the evolving relationships between the Chinese state (including the government, Chinese Communist Party, and the military) and Chinese society, as well as the functions of intermediate quasi-state organizations. In addition to these changes, we will also be analyzing and evaluating our ability to understand and to conceptualize these complex relationships over the past half-century. The course is in seminar format.

4000.02 Politics of Punishment: Theory and Practice
4cr | T 4:45-6:40 | Katzenstein, M

The Politics of Punishment: The seminar will address the question of how political institutions shape the climate and character of punishment in the United States. We will explore the role of interest groups, partisanship, public opinion, federalism, the courts, organized labor, and other institutional forces in shaping sentencing and crime-response policies. We will consider, further, how race and gender are incorporated into the norms and rules of institutional practices.

4000.03 The Presidency and Visual Culture
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Rubenstein, D

This course examines the visual culture of the postmodern presidency. It draws upon the traditions of symbolic politics, political rhetoric and critical American cultural studies. Presidencies from JFK to Obama will be examined in various media, including film and photography.

4061 Politics of Slow-Moving Crises
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Jones-Correa, M

This is an interdisciplinary research seminar focusing on what are arguably some of the most critical—and most intractable—issues of our time, issues such as population growth, population change (aging, immigration and retirement), water availability and global warming. Each of these involves a “slow-moving policy crisis,” a policy area in which the need for policy coordination is clear but the pressures for coordination are distant, since the consequences of policy action or inaction may be felt only years and often decades in the future. This course addresses the evaluation of probability and of risk, the difficulties and possibilities of coordination, the role of insurance and the private sector, and the role of the state versus philanthropy as a source for solutions to these problems with long time horizons. How have these issues been addressed in the past? How can these kinds of issues be addressed today?

4112 The Politics of Change
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Mettler, S

President Barack Obama was elected amidst great hopes among Americans that the nation can, with good leadership, address pressing issues. In this course, we assess Obama’s domestic policy agenda’s prospects for success by considering the institutional and political context of recent years, the challenges and opportunities posed by existing policies, and past efforts to address key issues. In the first few weeks of the semester, students will learn about the institutional features of the relationship between the White House and Capitol Hill and the rise of partisan polarization in Congress in recent years. The body of the course will focus on prominent issue areas on which Obama aims to make a difference: taxes & inequality, health care, higher education, K-12 education, and the environment. In each case, we will examine the issue in historical perspective by analyzing past reform efforts, and we will examine the Obama Administration’s record to date and consider the implications for success over the next few years. Students will have the opportunity to write in-depth research papers.

4241 Contemporary American Politics
4cr | T 2:30-4:25 | Shefter, M

This seminar analyzes some major changes in U.S. electoral and group politics in recent decades. Topics to be considered include: partisan realignment, the new conservatism, racial cleavages, “Identity politics,” and democratic decline.

4264 Social Movements in Latin America
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Roberts, K

This course analyzes different types of historical and contemporary social movements in Latin America. It begins with an overview of class-based labor and peasant movements, including their relationships with populist or leftist political parties. The class will then study revolutionary movements and the social actors that participate within them. The second half of the course will focus on various “new” social movements that have altered the region's social and political landscape over the past twenty years, including movements organized around gender issues, human rights, environmental protection, shantytown communities, and indigenous rights. Special attention will be given to the construction and transformation of collective identities, and to new patterns of social protest in response to market globalization in the region.

4281 Government and Public Policy
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Lowi, T

Concentrates on history and criticism of U.S. policies and the politics associated with them. Particular attention is given to the origins and character of the regulatory state and the welfare system. (AM)

4303 GMO Debate: Science and Society
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Herring R. & Theis J.

Biotechnology is causing global changes in agricultural production systems. Social movements have arisen to contest the adoption of transgenic or genetically modified organisms. Students will assess the science behind this debate and examine the interplay between science, society, and politics. We introduce the history of the GMO debate, how GMOs are developed, and their potential impacts on agriculture, the environment, and the food system. Social movements contest deployment of biotech products on grounds of food sovereignty, intellectual property, social justice, and environmental and human health concerns. Scientific evidence is used in a variety of ways in these debates. We integrate concepts from diverse fields to promote understanding of how the use of scientific evidence in social and political contexts impacts the assessment of agricultural biotechnologies.

4435 Education, Social Justice, and the Law
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Smith, AM

An interdisciplinary seminar that addresses political philosophy debates on the right to education, with special reference to school funding standards; and major court decisions on education equity issues, especially racial segregation; gender discrimination; affirmative action and voluntary integrative enrollment schemes; and state court litigation pertaining to the education amendments in the state constitutions. Our readings will be primarily drawn out of a casebook (e.g. Gee and Daniel, Law and Public Education) but we will also read several articles by normative political theorists, such as Elizabeth Anderson, Debra Satz, Harry Brighouse, and Adam Swift; as well as the work of litigators and education policy experts, including Michael Rebell, Helen Ladd, and Richard Rothstein.

4655 Social and Political Philosophy
4cr | R 2:30-4:25 | Miller, R

For description see PHIL 4470

4809 Politics of 70’s Films
4cr | MW 4:55-6:10 | Kirshner, J

The ten years from 1967 to 1976 were an extraordinary time both in the history of American politics and in the history of American film. In the same period that the country was rocked by the Vietnam War, the feminist and civil rights movements, Watergate and economic crisis, the end of Hollywood censorship along with demographic and economic change in the industry ushered in what many call "the last golden age"of American film. In this class we study both film theory and political history to examine these remarkable films and the political context in which they were forged. The goal of the course is to take seriously both the films and their politics. (AM or PT)

4827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
4cr | T 10:10-12:05 | Carlson, A

This seminar is intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system during the 1980s and 1990s. In it emphasis will be placed upon the inter-related, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy. We will especially concentrate on ongoing controversies over the rise of Chinese nationalism and the persistence of "minority nationalism" in many regions within China. (IR)

4862 Classics and Early America
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Rawlings, H

For description see CLASS 4683

4959 Honors: Research & Writing
4cr | N/A | Sanders, E

Limited to students who have completed GOVT 4949, Honors Thesis Program.

6029 Methods of Political Analysis II
4cr | TR 10:10-11:25 | Enns, P

This course includes an introduction to matrix algebra, statistical modeling, and a detailed study of OLS regression including assumptions and diagnostics.

6031 Field Seminar in American Politics
4cr | T 5:00-7:00 | Sanders, E

The major issues, approaches, and institutions of American government and the various subfields of American politics are introduced. The focus is on both substantive information and theoretical analysis. (AM)

6053 Comparative Methods in International & Comparative Politics
4cr | W 2:00-4:25 | Patel, D

An in-depth, graduate-level introduction to qualitative and comparative methods of political analysis, with special emphasis on the application of these methods in comparative and international politics. Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will explore strategies for concept formation, theory construction, and theory testing, using the craft and tools of comparative political analysis.

6067 Field Seminar in International Relations
4cr | T 2:00-4:25 | Kreps, S

A general survey of the literature and propositions of the international relations field. Criteria are developed for judging theoretical propositions and are applied to the major findings. Participants will be expected to do extensive reading in the literature as well as research.

6171 Politics of Public Policy
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Mettler, S

Much of the literature that comprises the field of policy analysis is characterized by antipathy to politics: scholars attempt to excise political battles and concerns from their studies in order to advance a “rational” portrayal of how policies do or should function. Yet, public policies are, themselves, inherently political. They are defined through political processes, designed and implemented in the context of political institutions, and they in turn shape the character of politics and public life. This course entails the examination and evaluation of a variety of approaches to policy analysis, all of which are united by their inclination to take politics seriously. Readings have been included that comprise variations of rational choice, institutionalist, historical, behavioral, and interpretivist analyses. The first part of the course examines different models of the policy process that may inform policy analysis. The second part of the course investigates policymaking processes and institutions and examines stages of the policy process, including public mobilization, policy definition, agenda setting, policy design and implementation. Special attention is given to the American system, focusing on policymaking institutions, processes and outcomes in that context, but students who focus on other nations the or international system may also find the course useful. The course concludes with an examination of how policies, once created, may in turn restructure political processes and shape policies adopted subsequently.

6264 Social Movements in Latin America
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Roberts, K

This course analyzes different types of historical and contemporary social movements in Latin America. It begins with an overview of class-based labor and peasant movements, including their relationships with populist or leftist political parties. The class will then study revolutionary movements and the social actors that participate within them. The second half of the course will focus on various “new” social movements that have altered the region's social and political landscape over the past twenty years, including movements organized around gender issues, human rights, environmental protection, shantytown communities, and indigenous rights. Special attention will be given to the construction and transformation of collective identities, and to new patterns of social protest in response to market globalization in the region.

6291 Contemporary American Politics
4cr | T 2:30-4:25 | Shefter, M

This seminar analyzes some major changes in U.S. electoral and group politics in recent decades. Topics to be considered include: partisan realignment, the new conservatism, racial cleavages, “Identity politics,” and democratic decline.

6423 Feminist Methodology
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Martin, S

For description see FGSS 6170

6656 Social and Political Philosophy
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Miller, R

For description see PHIL 6430

6494 Agrarian Political Economy
4cr | T 7:00-9:00 | Herring, R

Comparative political economy of pre-industrial and transitional societies, stressing alternative theories of dynamics of peasant society, rural development, environmental change and linkages to urban and industrial sectors and international system. We emphasize the impact of property systems and public law on human welfare and collective action. Theoretically, we explore the tensions between materialist political economy and competing interpretive frameworks.

6635 Education, Social Justice, and the Law
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Smith, AM

An interdisciplinary seminar that addresses political philosophy debates on the right to education, with special reference to school funding standards; and major court decisions on education equity issues, especially racial segregation; gender discrimination; affirmative action and voluntary integrative enrollment schemes; and state court litigation pertaining to the education amendments in the state constitutions. Our readings will be primarily drawn out of a casebook (e.g. Gee and Daniel, Law and Public Education) but we will also read several articles by normative political theorists, such as Elizabeth Anderson, Debra Satz, Harry Brighouse, and Adam Swift; as well as the work of litigators and education policy experts, including Michael Rebell, Helen Ladd, and Richard Rothstein.

6665 Media Theory
4cr | R 12:20-2:15 | Rubenstein, D

This seminar addresses two concerns: the specifically French contribution to visual theory in relation to the media of television, film and photography, and the political stakes of that theory in relation to larger issues of globalization, in which both image and event are subjected to ever increasing pressures. To what extent is French media theory a response to tele-technological imperatives? (PT)

6746 Kant’s Political Reason
4cr | T 7:30-9:25 | Gilgen, P

For description see GERST 6940

6827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
4cr | T 10:10-12:05 | Carlson, A

This seminar is intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system during the 1980s and 1990s. In it emphasis will be placed upon the inter-related, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy. We will especially concentrate on ongoing controversies over the rise of Chinese nationalism and the persistence of “minority nationalism” in many regions within China. (IR)

6897 International Security
4cr | M 7:00-9:30 | Weeks, J

This course will examine a variety of international relations theories in studying a broad range of security issues, including the causes of war, alliance formation, balance-of-power politics, security regimes, nuclear and conventional deterrence, the democratic peace, military strategy, international terrorism, and domestic constraints on the use of force. We will use a variety of theoretical perspective to investigate these and other issues, paying particular attention to evaluating the theoretical arguments with both historical and systematic evidence. (IR)

6927 Planning and Management of Agriculture and Rural Development
4cr | M 2:30-5:00 | Uphoff, N

For description see IARD 6030

7074 Game Theory 2: Advanced Topics
4cr | M 2:00-4:25 | Morrison, K

This is the second of two graduate courses on game theory in the government department. In the first half of this course, we will focus on advanced topics, including coalitional games, games of imperfect information, evolutionary games, and bargaining. The second half of the course will be focused on helping students develop their own models, using the techniques learned in both of the courses. Prerequisite: GOVT 7073.

7281 Government and Public Policy
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Lowi, T

Concentrates on history and criticism of U.S. policies and the politics associated with them. Particular attention is given to the origins and character of the regulatory state and the welfare system. (AM)

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