Courses

Teaching students how to think and to write rigorously and creatively about issues of public life

Spring 2012

Course Index & Descriptions

Introductory Courses
Note: Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class.
1313 Intro to Comparative Government and Politics
1615 Introduction to Political Philosophy
Major Seminars
Note: Apply on-line during the pre-enrollment period. Once classes have started, use an add/drop slip; professor’s signature is required.
4000.01 Authoritarianism
Other courses that fulfill seminar requirement
4032 Immigration and Politics Research Seminar
4092 Persuasive Politics
4142 Causes and Consequences of American Foreign Policy
4194 Asian Political Economy
4241 Contemporary American Politics
4274 Politics of Energy and Natural Resources
4827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
American Government and Institutions
3181 The U.S. Congress
Comparative Politics
3293 Comparative Politics of Latin America
3403 China Under Revolution and Reform
3413 Modern European Society and Politics
3443 Southeast Asian Politics
4303 GMO Debate: Science and Society (Not a Government seminar)
International Relations
3553 Issues Behind the News (2 crs/SX only)
3827 China and the World
3837 The Cold War
3867 Causes of War
Political Theory
3635 Human Rights and Global Justice
Honors Courses
4959 Honors: Research & Writing
Methods
6029 Advanced Regression Analysis
Graduate Seminars
Note: Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor.
6031 Field Seminar in American Politics
6053 Comparative Methods in International & Comparative Politics
6142 Causes and Consequences of American Foreign Policy
6182 Campaigns and Elections
6202 Political Culture
6291 Contemporary American Politics
6324 ProSeminar in Chinese Politics
6334 Political Economy of Development
6578 Critical Race Theory
6827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
6857 International Political Economy
6867 International Law, War, and Human Rights
6999 CPAS Weekly Colloquium
Cross-listed courses
3705 Political Theory and Cinema
3745 19th & 20th Century Euro. Thought
4252 Signal to Noise: The Politics of Sound (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4279 The Animal (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4303 The GMO Debate: Science and Society (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4565 Islamic Aural Cultures (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4606 Politics and Social Change in the Caribbean (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4765 Gender/Liberalism/Postcolonial Theory (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
6785 Persecution and Art of Writing
6917 Normative Issues in International Relations/The Rise of China
6927 Planning and Management of Agriculture and Rural Development
7765 Gender/Liberalism/Postcolonial Theory
Cross-listed: Taught in Cornell-in-Washington
3494 SpTp: Regional Development & Globalization
4218 History of the US Senate (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4998 Politics and Policy: Theory, Research, & Practice (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

1313 Intro to Comparative Government and Politics
4cr | MW 8:40-9:55 | Anderson, C

This course will introduce students to comparative politics—the study of the political institutions and processes of countries around the world. Emphasis is on how to make meaningful comparisons between systems in different countries. The course will cover conditions for and workings of democracy, with an emphasis on how different kinds of democracies work. Course will provide a framework for comparison, and students will choose specific countries to compare. The United States will be considered in comparative perspective. Important topics to be covered include the vibrancy of democracy, the centrality of political and electoral institutions, the possibility of revolution, and the power of ethnicity.

1615 Introduction to Political Philosophy
4cr | MWF 11:15-12:05 | Frank, J.

A survey of the development of Western political theory from Plato to the present. Readings from the works of the major theorists. An examination of the relevance of their ideas to contemporary politics.

3181 The U.S. Congress
4cr | MW 2:55-4:10 | Shefter, M.

The role of Congress in the American political system. Topics to be discussed: the political setting within which Congress operates, the structure of Congress, the salient features of the legislative process, and recent congressional behavior in a number of policy areas.

3293 Comparative Politics of Latin America
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Flores-Macias, G.

This course is designed as an introduction to political, economic, and social issues in 20th century Latin America. Topics are organized chronologically, beginning with the process of industrialization and incorporation of the popular sectors in the 1930s and 1940s, and ending with the recent rise of the left to power in the region. Among the main issues covered are populism and corporatism, dependency theory and import-substitution industrialization, revolutions, the breakdown of democracy, military rule, democratic transitions, debt crisis and market reforms, social movements, and migration. Throughout the semester, we will draw on examples from the entire region, but the course will focus on six main countries, namely Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and Venezuela. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is not required.

3403 China Under Revolution and Reform
4cr | TR 11:40-12:55 | Mertha, A.

This course provides a broad overview of the evolution of Chinese politics from the early part of the 20th century to the present. It is roughly divided into two sections. The first traces the formation and the progression of modern state and party institutions following the collapse of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, through the communist rise to power and into the Mao era (1949–1976), culminating in the period of “opening up and reform” (1978–present). The second part of the course examines China’s institutional apparatus, focusing on mapping out the government, Party, and military bureaucracies; examining relations between Beijing and the localities; and on the institutionalization of these structures and processes over time. No prior knowledge of China is required or expected.

3413 Modern European Society and Politics
4cr | TR 8:40-9:55 | Van Morgan, S.

This survey course provides an interdisciplinary overview of European social and political issues. Themes of the course will include, but will not be limited to, the political development of the nation-state, modes of governance, welfare state restructuring, party systems and elections, social movements, immigration and demography, culture and identity, external relations, and the special challenges posed by European political and economic integration. A series of background and contextual lectures will be complemented by presentations given by leading Europeanists. (CO)

3443 Southeast Asian Politics
4cr | TR 2:55-4:10 | Pepinsky, T.

This course will give students the historical background and theoretical tools to understand the politics of Southeast Asia, one of the world’s most diverse and fascinating regions. The first part of the course traces Southeast Asia’s political development from the colonial period to the present day, examining common themes such as decolonization, state building, war and insurgency, ethnic relations, democratization, economic development, and nationalism. The second part of the course focuses on key issues in contemporary Southeast Asian politics, including political culture, representation and mass politics, globalization, regional politics, and civil violence. Our course will concentrate primarily but not exclusively on the six largest countries in the region—Burma, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam—using the comparative method to understand variation across time, across countries, and within countries.

3494 SpTp: Regional Development & Globalization
4cr | TBA | Cornell-in-Washington Program | Edwards, H.

For description see Cornell-in-Washington website: (http://www.ciw.cornell.edu/).

3553 Issues Behind the News
2cr/SX only | W 2:55-4:10 | Van de Walle, N.

This course will cover international current events as they unfold during the semester. Faculty from across the university will be invited to contextualize and deepen students’ understanding of elections, wars, complex humanitarian emergencies, international agreements, global health issues and other relevant international events that are in the news. The course will respond flexibly to unforeseen events. Special attention will be devoted to U.S. foreign policy issues and how U.S. foreign policies are formulated and implemented. The course will strive to expose students to different points of view on these issues.

3635 Human Rights and Global Justice
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Smith, A. M.

In this course, we will move between the study of (1) general concepts of justice and human rights: liberty rights; political rights; and social rights (such as the right to education); (2) concrete problems pertaining to the interpretation of international human rights agreements and U.S. constitutional law; and (3) contemporary moral/legal controversies, including the legal vulnerability of the homeless and unauthorized immigrant children, and our moral duties toward them; the legal status of enhanced interrogation techniques, including torture; the normative debates on multiculturalism, women’s rights, and cosmopolitanism; the possibilities of building a global civil society; and the moral obligations of citizens in the developed world with respect to the least advantaged in the developing countries.

3705 Political Theory and Cinema
4cr | MW 2:55-4:10 | Waite, G.

For description see: GERST 3550.

3745 19th & 20th Century Euro. Thought
4cr | TR 2:55-4:10 | Kosch, M.

For description see: PHIL 2240.

3827 China and the World
4cr | MW 8:40-9:55 | Carlson, A.

Study of the dramatic rise of China through reviewing major developments in contemporary Chinese foreign policy since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and concentrating more specifically on major developments in Chinese foreign policy during the 1980s and 1990s. Such a wide-ranging survey of Chinese foreign policy involves not only a consideration of the evolution of China’s relations with its major bilateral partners but also an investigation of how China has defined its broader relationship with the international system. In addition, students are asked to consider which causal factors have been of primary importance in motivating Chinese behavior. (IR)

3837 The Cold War
4cr | TR 8:40-9:55 | Evangelista, M.

During more than four decades following the end of World War II international politics was dominated by a phenomenon known as the Cold War. This class examines the origins, course, and ultimate demise of this conflict that pitted the United States and NATO against the Soviet Union and its allies. It seeks to evaluate the competing explanations that political scientists and historians have put forward to explain the Cold War by drawing on the new evidence that has become available. The course considers political, economic, and strategic aspects of the Cold War, including the nuclear arms race, with particular focus on the link between domestic and foreign policy in the United States and the Soviet Union. The course emphasizes writing, and includes a final research paper for which students will use original archival materials. (IR)

3867 Causes of War
4cr | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Way, C.

This course surveys leading theories of the causes of interstate war – that is, large scale organized violence between the armed forces of states. Why is war a recurring feature of international politics? Are democracies more peaceful than other types of states, and if so what explains this “democratic peace”? Why do democratic publics seem to reward threats to use force by “rallying around the flag” in support of their governments? Does the inexorable pattern of the rise and fall of nations lead to cycles of great power wars throughout history? These and other questions will be examined in our survey of theories of war at three levels of analysis: the individual and small groups, domestic politics, and the international system. Topics covered include: 1) theoretical explanations for war; 2) evaluation of the evidence for the various explanations; 3) the impact of nuclear weapons on international politics; 4) ethics and warfare; 5) the uses and limitations of air power; 6) international terrorism. (IR)

4000.01 Authoritarianism
4cr | M 10:10-12:05 | Bunce, V.

The purpose of this course is two-fold: to hold class discussions based on a common set of weekly assigned readings on contemporary authoritarian regimes and to write a research paper (involving additional work) analyzing authoritarian leaders and authoritarian regimes. The paper can be a case study or a comparison of several regimes, and the focus of the paper can be on the origins, structure, ideology, practices, or collapse of one or more authoritarian regimes.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)

4032 Immigration and Politics Research Seminar
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Jones-Correa, M.

In the 2000s immigration to the United States became national, touching almost every state and county. This course traces the dispersal of immigration in the U.S., to rural counties in the South and Midwest, to new gateway cities like Seattle and Boston, to suburbs outside places like Washington D.C.. With hands-on use of demographic and survey data, students will explore the ways these settlement patterns raise new issues for immigrant integration, distinct political responses at the local, state and national levels, and proposals for new immigration policies.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)

4092 Persuasive Politics
4cr | M 8:00-9:55 | Levine, A.

Persuasion is inherent in politics. In this course students will learn about the conditions under which persuasion occurs and does not occur in political settings, and the implications for political outcomes such as public opinion and political participation. The principles we discuss will apply to all venues of political communication and debate, including campaigns, policy debates, etc (AM)

(Fulfills seminar requirement)

4142 Causes and Consequences of American Foreign Policy
4cr | M 2:30-4:25 | Sanders, E.

How can we characterize the twentieth/twenty first century legacy and continuing impact of US foreign policy on the world? What forces-- domestic, international, institutional, electoral, economic, cultural, or personal--drive US foreign policy? These are the broad questions to be addressed this semester.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)

4194 Asian Political Economy
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Pepinsky, T.

This seminar is an advanced introduction to political economy in contemporary South, Southeast, and East Asia. Our central task is to uncover the political underpinnings of economic performance across countries and over time. Along the way, we will address issues such as corruption and rent-seeking, the developmental state, class conflict, ethnic politics, reform and stagnation, and democracy.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)

4218 History of the US Senate
4cr | TBA Cornell-in-Washington Program | Edwards, H.

For description see Cornell-in-Washington website: (http://www.ciw.cornell.edu/).

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

4241 Contemporary American Politics
4cr | T 2:30-4:25 | Shefter, M.

This seminar analyzes some major changes in U.S. electoral and group politics in recent decades. Topics to be considered include: partisan realignment, the new conservatism, racial cleavages, “Identity politics,” and democratic decline.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)

4252 Signal to Noise: The Politics of Sound
4cr | T 2:30-4:25 | Lott, E.

For description see: SHUM 4964.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

4274 Politics of Energy and Natural Resources
4cr | T 10:10-12:05 | Flores-Macias, G.

This course is an introduction to the political economy of energy and natural resources. It is designed to give students a broad understanding of essential concepts, regions, and topics. Topics include resource dependence, rentier states, state-owned energy companies, OPEC, energy security, and the effects of resource dependence on development, democracy, policy making, and conflict.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)

4279 The Animal
4cr | TR 2:55-4:10 | Gilgen, P.

For description see: GERST 4260.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

4303 The GMO Debate: Science & Society
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Herring, R; Hobbs, P.; Thies, J.

For description see: CSS 4100.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

4565 Islamic Aural Cultures
4cr | M 10:10-12:05 | Jouili, J.

For description see: SHUM 4962.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

4606 Politics and Social Change in the Caribbean
4cr | M 1:25-4:25 | Edmondson, L.

For description see ASRC 4600.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

4765 Gender/Liberalism/Postcolonial Theory
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Hodzic, S.

For description see: FGSS 4445.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

4827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
4cr | T 10:10-12:05 | Carlson, A.

This seminar is intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system during the 1980s and 1990s. In it emphasis will be placed upon the inter-related, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy. We will especially concentrate on ongoing controversies over the rise of Chinese nationalism and the persistence of “minority nationalism” in many regions within China. (IR)

(Fulfills seminar requirement)

4959 Honors: Research & Writing
4cr | TBA Sanders, E.

Limited to students who have completed GOVT 4949, Honors Thesis Program.

4998 Politics and Policy: Theory, Research, & Practice
4cr | TBA | Cornell-in-Washington Program | Edwards, H.

For description see Cornell-in-Washington website: (http://www.ciw.cornell.edu/).

(Will not fulfill Govt.seminar req.)

6029 Advanced Regression Analysis
4cr | R 10:10-1:10 | Corrigan, B.

This course builds upon 6019, covering in detail the interpretation and estimation of multivariate linear regression models. We derive the Ordinary Least Squares estimator and its characteristics using matrix algebra and determine the conditions under which it achieves statistical optimality. We then consider the circumstances in social scientific contexts which commonly lead to assumption violations, and the detection and implications of these problems. This leads to modified regression estimators that can offer limited forms of robustness in some of these cases. Finally, we briefly introduce likelihood-based techniques that incorporate assumptions about the distribution of the response variable, focusing on logistic regression for binary dependent variables. Students are expected to produce a research paper built around a quantitative analysis that is suitable for presentation at a professional conference. Sometime will be spent reviewing matrix algebra, and discussing ways to implement computations using statistical software.

6031 Field Seminar in American Politics
4cr | T 5:00-7:00p | Sanders, E.

The major issues, approaches, and institutions of American government and the various subfields of American politics are introduced. The focus is on both substantive information and theoretical analysis, plus identification of big questions that have animated the field. (AM)

6053 Comparative Methods in International & Comparative Politics
4cr | W 2:00-4:25 | Pepinsky, T.

An in-depth, graduate-level introduction to qualitative and comparative methods of political analysis, with special emphasis on the application of these methods in comparative and international politics. Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will explore strategies for concept formation, theory construction, and theory testing, using the craft and tools of comparative political analysis.

6142 Causes and Consequences of American Foreign Policy
4cr | M 2:30-4:25 | Sanders, E.

How can we characterize the twentieth/twenty first century legacy and continuing impact of US foreign policy on the world? What forces-- domestic, international, institutional, electoral, economic, cultural, or personal--drive US foreign policy? These are the broad questions to be addressed this semester.

6182 Campaigns and Elections
4cr | T 10:10-12:05 | Levine, A.

This doctoral seminar examines scholarly research related to campaigns and elections in the American political context. The focus is on questions related to candidate strategy, the broader political context (such as economic conditions), and the conditions under which political campaigns affect political decision-making. Various forms of decision-making are considered, including decisions to turn out, choose a particular candidate, donate money, and volunteer time. (AM)

6202 Political Culture
4cr | M 5:30-7:30p | Bensel, R.

This course will explore the relationship between popular belief, political action, and the institutional deployment of social power. The class will be roughly divided in three parts, opening with a discussion of how the material world influences the culture of a society. The middle section will connect culture to political ideology, including symbolism and the construction of group identity. The last part of the course will consider ways in which cultural symbols and ideology can be manipulated in order to legitimate government authority. We will then, coming full circle, trace how political regimes can influence the social practices from which culture originates.

6291 Contemporary American Politics
4cr | T 2:30-4:25 | Shefter, M.

This seminar analyzes some major changes in U.S. electoral and group politics in recent decades. Topics to be considered include: partisan realignment, the new conservatism, racial cleavages, "Identity politics," and democratic decline.

6324 ProSeminar in Chinese Politics
4cr | T 2:30-4:25 | Mertha, A.

This proseminar in Chinese politics has three goals. The first is to analyze Chinese politics from several dimensions (elite politics, Center-local relations, institutions, state and society, the military, etc.). The second is to situate China within the larger context of comparative politics more generally: what we can learn about China by leveraging insights from the subfield of comparative politics (the anthropology of the state, institutions, social movements, etc.) and vice versa? The third goal is to trace the evolution of the study of China from 1950s Kremlinology to the present day field-research continuously unfolding, and in real time, from all over China.

6334 Political Economy of Development
4cr | F 1:25-4:25 | Morrison, K.

This course provides an overview of major theoretical and empirical works regarding the political determinants of improvements in human wellbeing. Focusing broadly on issues of economic growth and distribution, the topics 10/13/2011 11:46 AMwe will cover include economic reform, industrialization strategies, agricultural development, the institutional foundations of growth, human capital development, regional inequality, and poverty reduction. Along the way, we will encounter a variety of theoretical traditions as well as methodological approaches, and touch on most regions of the world.

6578 Critical Race Theory
4cr | W 5:00-7:00 | Smith, A. M.

A political theory seminar that deals primarily with the conceptual and normative questions pertaining to racism and racial identity in the United States context. The emphasis will be placed, in the 2012 version of this seminar, on the politics of the White/African-American relationship in particular. A partial list of the major figures and commentators that will be covered includes W.E.B. Du Bois; Frederick Douglass; Ida B. Wells; Charles Hamilton Houston; Thurgood Marshall; Charles Mills; Bernard Boxill; Cornel West; Kwame Anthony Appiah; Robert Gooding-Williams; Tommie Shelby; Rogers Smith; Anthony Marx; Frantz Fanon; Edward Said; Etienne Balibar; Aziz Rana; A. Leon Higginbotham; Charles Lawrence; Kimberle Crenshaw; James Tully; Douglas Massey and Nancy Denton; Michael Omi and Howard Winant; Linda Faye Williams; and Uday Singh Mehta; as well as Emmanuel Eze’s anthology, Race and the Enlightenment. The course is designed primarily for graduate students. Ideally, students will have some background in African American studies and/or American political thought.

Permission to enroll in the course can be obtained by writing directly to the instructor (ams3@cornell.edu).

6785 Persecution and Art of Writing
4cr | T 12:20-2:15 | Waite, G.

For description, see GERST 6780.

6827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
4cr | T 10:10-12:05 | Carlson, A.

This seminar is intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system during the 1980s and 1990s. In it emphasis will be placed upon the inter-related, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regards to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy. We will especially concentrate on ongoing controversies over the rise of Chinese nationalism and the persistence of "minority nationalism" in many regions within China. (IR)

6857 International Political Economy
4cr | M 2:30-4:25 | Kirshner, J.

An exploration into a range of contemporary theories and research topics in the field of international political economy. The seminar will cover different theoretical perspectives and a number of substantive problems.

6867 International Law, War, and Human Rights
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Evangelista, M.

This course examines the role of international law in influencing states’ behavior regarding issues related to war and human rights. It draws on literature in the fields of international relations and law to study such questions as: why states comply with international law; under what conditions legal norms become customary and widely accepted; under what conditions longstanding legal norms become undermined; and what is the relative influence in shaping the law of state practice, the efforts of non-state actors and popular movements, and the opinions of legal professionals? Much of the substantive focus of the course will be on the development of international humanitarian law and human-rights law, and the impact of the “War on Terror.”

6917 Normative Issues in International Relations/The Rise of China
2cr | T 3:00-5:00 | Miller, R. et al.

For description: see PHIL 6470.

6927 Planning and Management of Agriculture and Rural Development
4cr | M 2:30-5:00 | Uphoff, N.

For description, see IARD 6030.

6999 CPAS Weekly Colloquium
1cr | R 4:30-6:00 | Lowi, T., et. al.

Colloquium is the weekly seminar series hosted by the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA). It is also a required, one-credit course for al CIPA Fellows, and is graded S/U based on attendance. The colloquium series is a collaborative effort between the CIPA Colloquium Committee and the faculty and staff of CIPA.

7765 Gender/Liberalism/Postcolonial Theory
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Hodzic, S.

For description, see FGSS 7445.

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