Courses

Teaching students how to think and to write rigorously and creatively about issues of public life

Spring 2013

Course Index & Descriptions

Introductory Courses
Note: Students registering for introductory courses should register for the lecture only. Sections will be assigned during the first week of class.
1313 Intro to Comparative Government and Politics
1615 Introduction to Political Philosophy
Major Seminars
Note: Apply on-line during the pre-enrollment period. Once classes have started, use an add/drop slip; professor’s signature is required.
4000.03 Gender, Nationalism, and War
Other courses that fulfill seminar requirement
4051 Postmodern Presidency: Election 2012
4092 Persuasive Politics
4354 Comp Political Econ of Adv. Industrialized States
4424 The Theory & Pract of Democratic Politics in Africa
4605 Theoretical Approaches to Ideology
4705 Contemporary Readings of the Ancients: Plato
4827 Unifying while Integrating: China & World
4937 Going Nuclear: Spread of Nuclear Weapons & Energy
American Government and Institutions
3161 The American Presidency
3212 Public Opinion & Representation
4092 Persuasive Politics
Comparative Politics
3293 Comparative Politics of Latin America
3313 Middle Eastern Politics
3403 China Under Revolution/Reform
4303 GMO Debate: Science and Society (Not a Government senior seminar)
4354 Comp Political Econ of Adv. Industrialized States
4424 The Theory & Pract of Democratic Politics in Africa
International Relations
3827 China and the World
3867 The Causes of War
4827 Unifying while Integrating: China & World
4937 Going Nuclear: Spread of Nuclear Weapons & Energy
Political Theory
3635 Human Rights and Global Justice
4051 Postmodern Presidency: Election 2012
4605 Theoretical Approaches to Ideology
4615 Islamic Political Thought (Not a Government senior seminar)
4705 Contemporary Readings of the Ancients: Plato
Honors Courses
4959 Honors: Research & Writing
Methods
6029 Advanced Regression Analysis
Graduate Seminars
Note: Qualified undergraduates are encouraged to apply for seminars listed with 6000 course numbers, but may only register with the permission of the instructor.
6053 Comparative Methods in International & Comparative Politics
6101 Politics, Groups and Identities
6171 Politics of Public Policy
6182 Campaigns and Elections
6293 Comparative Urbanization
6313 Parties & Pol Representation
6424 The Theory & Pract of Democratic Politics in Africa
6494 Agrarian Political Economy
6509 Contemporary Readings of the Ancients: Plato
6605 Theoretical Approaches to Ideology
6766 Pluralism
6775 Language & Politics
6827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
6897 International Security
6937 Going Nuclear: Spread of Nuclear Weapons & Energy
6999 CPAS Weekly Colloquium
Cross-listed Courses
1503 The Shape of American Culture
2240 Ecology and Politics of the Metropolis
3131 Nature, Functions, and Limits of Law
3303 Politics of the Global North
3625 Modern Political Philosophy
3633 Politics and Culture
4303 The GMO Debate: Science and Society (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4339 Nationalism(s) in Arab World (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4606 Politics and Social Change in the Caribbean (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4736 Risk, Romance, and Revolution (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4775 Politics of Risk in Early Modernity (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
6303 Comparative Political Economy & Global Debates
6927 Planning and Management of Agriculture and Rural Development
Cross-listed: Taught in Cornell-In-Washington
3191 Racial & Ethnic Politics in the US
3494 SpTp: Regional Development & Globalization
4218 History of the US Senate (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4998 Politics and Policy: Theory, Research, & Practice (Will not fulfill Govt. seminar req.)

1313 Intro to Comparative Government and Politics
4cr | MW 2:55-4:10 | Mertha, A.

This course will introduce students to comparative politics—the study of the political institutions and processes of countries around the world. Emphasis is on how to make meaningful comparisons between systems in different countries. The course will cover conditions for and workings of democracy, with an emphasis on how different kinds of democracies work. Course will provide a framework for comparison, and students will choose specific countries to compare. The United States will be considered in comparative perspective. Important topics to be covered include the vibrancy of democracy, the centrality of political and electoral institutions, the possibility of revolution, and the power of ethnicity.

1503 The Shape of American Culture
4 cr. | TR 11:40-12:55 | Rooks, N.

For description, see ASRC 1500

1615 Introduction to Political Philosophy
4cr | MWF 11:15-12:05 | Frank, J.

This course offers a survey of modern political theory in the West. We will examine some of the persistent dilemmas of political modernity and the attempts of several canonical political theorists to respond to them: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. In each case, we will attend to the particular crises these theorists addressed in their work—such as the European wars of religion, the English Civil War, colonialism, the French Revolution, and industrial capitalism—as well as the broader philosophical and political issues they continue to pose to us now. Our approach will be both historical and conceptual, in other words, with the hopes of providing students with a nuanced but clear understanding of political theory as a distinctive form of political inquiry. (PT)

2240 Ecology and Politics of the Metropolis
3cr | TR 2:55-4:10 | Whitlow, T.H. & Sanders, E.

For description and learning outcomes, see HORT 2240.

3131 The Nature, Functions, and Limits of Law
4cr | MW 2:55-4:10 | Chutkow, D.

For description, see LAW 4131.

3161 The American Presidency
4cr | TR 10:10-11:25 | Sanders, E.

This course will explore and seek explanations for the performance of the 20-21st century presidency, focusing on its institutional and political development, recruitment process (nominations and elections), relationships to social groups, economic forces, and “political time.” We will also analyze the parameters of foreign & domestic policy making.

3191 Racial & Ethnic Politics in the US
4cr | T 7:00-9:30 | J. Ajinkya

For description, see Cornell-in-Washington Website

3212 Public Opinion & Representation
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Enns, P

This course focuses on public opinion in the United States. Students will learn about the public’s policy preferences, where these preferences come from, under what conditions public opinion influences government, and whose opinions matter most to policy makers. Students will also learn how to collect and analyze public opinion data.

3293 Comparative Politics of Latin America
4cr | TR 2:55-4:10 | Flores-Macias, G.

This course is designed as an introduction to political, economic, and social issues in 20th century Latin America. Topics are organized chronologically, beginning with the process of industrialization and incorporation of the popular sectors in the 1930s and 1940s, and ending with the recent rise of the left to power in the region. Among the main issues covered are populism and corporatism, dependency theory and import-substitution industrialization, revolutions, the breakdown of democracy, military rule, democratic transitions, debt crisis and market reforms, social movements, and migration. Throughout the semester, we will draw on examples from the entire region, but the course will focus on six main countries, namely Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, Mexico, and Venezuela. Knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is not required.

3303 Politics of the Global North
4cr | MW 11:40-12:55 | Turner, L.

For description, see ILRIC 4430. (CO)

3313 Middle Eastern Politics
4cr | TR 11:40-12:55 | Patel, D.

This course provides an introduction to contemporary Middle Eastern politics. The goal is to provide students with historical background and theoretical tools to answer the following core questions: (1) Do authoritarian political systems persist in the Middle East more than they do elsewhere? If so, why? (2) Why have Islamist groups become prominent political forces in and across some countries? (3) Why did some Arab countries but not others experience popular uprisings or civil war during the so-called “Arab Spring”? (4) What role does oil play in the domestic and international politics of the region? (5) Would the adoption of Western-style political institutions improve governance and stability in the region? The course explicitly compares outcomes and explanations within the region, between the region and other world areas, and over time.

3403 China Under Revolution and Reform
4cr | TR 11:40-12:55 | Mertha, A.

This course provides a broad overview of the evolution of Chinese politics from the early part of the 20th century to the present. It is roughly divided into two sections. The first traces the formation and the progression of modern state and party institutions following the collapse of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, through the communist rise to power and into the Mao era (1949–1976), culminating in the period of “opening up and reform” (1978–present). The second part of the course examines China’s institutional apparatus, focusing on mapping out the government, Party, and military bureaucracies; examining relations between Beijing and the localities; and on the institutionalization of these structures and processes over time. No prior knowledge of China is required or expected.

3494 SpTp: Regional Development & Globalization
4cr | TBA | Cornell-in-Washington Program | Palacios, J.

For description see Cornell-in-Washington website: (http://www.ciw.cornell.edu/).

3625 Modern Political Philosophy
4cr | TR 2:55-4:10 | Miller, R.

For description see PHIL 3460.

3633 Politics and Culture
4cr | TR 10:10-11:00 | Berezin, M.

For description, see SOC 2480.

3635 Human Rights and Global Justice
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Smith, A. M.

In this course, we will move between the study of (1) general concepts of justice and human rights: liberty rights; political rights; and social rights (such as the right to education); (2) concrete problems pertaining to the interpretation of international human rights agreements and U.S. constitutional law; and (3) contemporary moral/legal controversies, including the legal vulnerability of the homeless and unauthorized immigrant children, and our moral duties toward them; the legal status of enhanced interrogation techniques, including torture; the normative debates on multiculturalism, women’s rights, and cosmopolitanism; the possibilities of building a global civil society; and the moral obligations of citizens in the developed world with respect to the least advantaged in the developing countries.

3827 China and the World
4cr | MW 8:40-9:55 | Carlson, A.

Study of the dramatic rise of China through reviewing major developments in contemporary Chinese foreign policy since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China (PRC), and concentrating more specifically on major developments in Chinese foreign policy during the 1980s and 1990s. Such a wide-ranging survey of Chinese foreign policy involves not only a consideration of the evolution of China’s relations with its major bilateral partners but also an investigation of how China has defined its broader relationship with the international system. In addition, students are asked to consider which causal factors have been of primary importance in motivating Chinese behavior. (IR)

3867 Causes of War
4cr | MWF 10:10-11:00 | Way, C.

This course surveys leading theories of the causes of interstate war – that is, large scale organized violence between the armed forces of states. Why is war a recurring feature of international politics? Are democracies more peaceful than other types of states, and if so what explains this “democratic peace”? Why do democratic publics seem to reward threats to use force by “rallying around the flag” in support of their governments? Does the inexorable pattern of the rise and fall of nations lead to cycles of great power wars throughout history? These and other questions will be examined in our survey of theories of war at three levels of analysis: the individual and small groups, domestic politics, and the international system. Topics covered include: 1) theoretical explanations for war; 2) evaluation of the evidence for the various explanations; 3) the impact of nuclear weapons on international politics; 4) ethics and warfare; 5) the uses and limitations of air power. (IR)

4000.03 Gender, Nationalism, and War
4cr | T 1:25-4:25 | Evangelista, M.

What is the relevance of gender to nationalism, conflict, and war? The association of hostility, aggression and bloodshed with masculinity - and conciliation and peace-seeking with female attributes - repeatedly surfaces in portrayals of militaries and violent strife. This course examines works in several disciplines and media to evaluate generalizations that link gender, nationalism, and war. Our texts include books, essays and films, as well as political and sociological writings. The seminar is scheduled for three hours so that we will have time to watch films and discuss them in the same session.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4051 Postmodern Presidency: Election 2012
4cr | T 2:30-4:25 | Rubenstein, D.

For description, see AMST 4305.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4092 Persuasive Politics
4cr | M 8:00-9:55 | Levine, A.

Persuasion is inherent in politics. In this course students will learn about the conditions under which persuasion occurs and does not occur in political settings, and the implications for political outcomes such as public opinion and political participation. The principles we discuss will apply to all venues of political communication and debate, including campaigns, policy debates, etc (AM)

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4218 History of the U.S. Senate
4cr | TBA | TBA

For description, see Cornell-in-Washington Website

(Will not fulfills Government seminar requirement)
4303 The GMO Debate: Science and Society
4cr | TR 1:25-2:40 | Herring, Thies & Hobbs

For description, see CSS 4100. (Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)

4339 Nationalism(s) in Arab World
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Fahmy, Z.

For description, see NES 4672.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4354 Comp Political Econ of Adv. Industrialized States
4cr | T 12:20-2:15 | Kuo, A.

This seminar is on the comparative political economy of advanced industrialized states in the Post-War era. Students will examine the following questions: what explains variation in economic outcomes across countries? How does politics affect such variation? Why do Western Europe and the United States have different economic systems, and what are the consequences of such differences? Students will learn approaches to address the above questions, and apply such approaches to their own research.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4424 The Theory & Practice of Democratic Politics in Africa
4cr | TR 8:40-9:55 | van de Walle, N.

How has politics evolved in Sub Saharan Africa since a wave of democratic reforms swept through the region in the early 1990s? This seminar aims to examine the process of democratization in the region, the extent and limits of democratic reforms and their implications for politics in the region. The class will thus examine the emerging literature on “hybrid” regimes, which combine features of democratic and authoritarian politics; on the dynamics of recent elections, such emerging practices as vote buying, and the party systems that have emerged from two decades of elections; and on the impact of democratic practices on socio-economic outcomes. (CP)

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4605 Theoretical Approaches to Ideology
4cr | M 2:30-4:25 | Smith, A. M.

Profound controversies revolve around the definition of “ideology,” its relationship to the interests of dominant groups, the means by which it is circulated throughout diverse social sites, its capacity to influence worldviews and identifications, and its institutional expression. We will lay the groundwork for the seminar by examining social contract theory and key texts on ideology by Marx and Foucault. In the second part of the course, we will explore various schools of ideological analysis; for the spring 2013 version of the seminar, we will focus in particular on feminist and critical race theory.

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4606 Politics and Social Change in the Caribbean
4cr | M 1:25-4:25 | Edmondson, L.

For description see: ASRC 4600

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4615 Islamic Political Thought
4cr | R 1:25-4:25 | Idris, M.

This course examines Islamic political thought within the field of political theory. We will study some of the major intellectual developments and transformations, moving from commentaries on cities and empires, to allegories about animals and kings, and then to modern reformulations of the state, liberalism, and colonialism. We will explore themes central to political life, including theories of justice and community, war and violence, and difference and freedom, while situating our texts in relation to political thought more generally. Readings include writings by al-Farabi, al-Razi, Ibn Muqaffa‘, Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Khaldun, as well as modern authors like al-Afghani, Rashid Rida, Nemik Kemal, and Sayyid Qutb. (PT)

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4705 Contemporary Readings of the Ancients: Plato
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Rubenstein, D.

Occasioned by the new publication of Alain Badiou’s Republic, this semester we will focus on contemporary continental readings of Plato. A significant part of the semester will involve a close reading of The Republic, inspired by Badiou and Avital Ronell’s Loser Sons. Other texts will include Timaeus and The Phaedrus; Derrida, Baudrillard, Le Doeuff and Irigaray will figure among the interlocutors. (PT)

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4736 Rick, Romance, and Revolution
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Verhoeven, C.

For description, see SHUM 4976.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4775 Politics of Risk in Early Modernity
4cr | R 10:10-12:05 | Nacol, E.

For description, see SHUM 4975.

(Will not fulfill Government seminar req.)
4827 Unifying while Integrating: China & World
4cr | T 10:10-12:05 | Carlson, A.

Seminar intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system during the 1980s and 1990s. Emphasizes the interrelated, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regard to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy. Concentrates especially on ongoing controversies over the rise of Chinese nationalism and the persistence of “minority nationalism” in many regions within China. (IR)

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4937 Going Nuclear: Spread of Nuclear Weapons & Energy
4cr | T 10:10-12:35 | Way, C.

What are the causes and consequences of the spread of nuclear weapons and of nuclear energy? Why do some countries pursue nuclear weapons while others refrain from doing so? What are the consequences of the spread of nuclear weapons? What are the drivers of the spread of nuclear energy? Who can operate nuclear energy plants safely, and who cannot? And will the widely predicted “nuclear renaissance” still occur given the Fukushima-Daiichi disaster? This class is a research seminar aimed at heightening awareness of methodological problems entailed in attempting to gain causal knowledge about questions like these. We will work on developing skills to improve both descriptive inference and (where possible) causal inference on topics that fall under the umbrella topic of “going nuclear.” Assignments center on a substantial original research project. A basic research design class or social sciences methods class would provide useful background, although it is not a prerequisite. Familiarity with nuclear weapons/energy issues is not required to take the class. (IR)

(Fulfills seminar requirement)
4959 Honors: Research & Writing
4cr | TBA | Herring, R.

Limited to students who have completed GOVT 4949, Honors Thesis Program.

4998 Politics and Policy: Theory, Research, & Practice
4cr | TBA Cornell-in-Washington Program | Sibley,D.

For description see Cornell-in-Washington website: (http://www.ciw.cornell.edu/).

(Will not fulfill Govt. seminar req.)
6029 Advanced Regression Analysis
4cr | R 10:10-1:10 | Corrigan, B.

This course builds upon 6019, covering in detail the interpretation and estimation of multivariate linear regression models. We derive the Ordinary Least Squares estimator and its characteristics using matrix algebra and determine the conditions under which it achieves statistical optimality. We then consider the circumstances in social scientific contexts which commonly lead to assumption violations, and the detection and implications of these problems. This leads to modified regression estimators that can offer limited forms of robustness in some of these cases. Finally, we briefly introduce likelihood-based techniques that incorporate assumptions about the distribution of the response variable, focusing on logistic regression for binary dependent variables. Students are expected to produce a research paper built around a quantitative analysis that is suitable for presentation at a professional conference. Some time will be spent reviewing matrix algebra, and discussing ways to implement computations using statistical software.

6053 Comparative Methods in International & Comparative Politics
4cr | W 2:00-4:25 | Patel, D.

An in-depth, graduate-level introduction to qualitative and comparative methods of political analysis, with special emphasis on the application of these methods in comparative and international politics. Through readings, discussions, and written assignments, students will explore strategies for concept formation, theory construction, and theory testing, using the craft and tools of comparative political analysis.

6101 Politics, Groups and Identities
4cr | W 7:00-9:00 | Jones-Correa, M.

Groups matter for the study of politics. Individuals mobilize, not only individually, but as members of groups. Nationality, ethnicity, race, gender, religion all imply an understanding of ‘groupness’—of what makes a group a group. This course is an exploration, through literatures drawing from various disciplines, of group identity, of how social scientists think about groups, and of how these are politically relevant. (AM)

6171 Politics of Public Policy
4cr | W 10:10-12:05 | Mettler, S.

The prevailing approach to policy analysis gives little attention to politics, yet public policies are defined through political processes, designed and implemented in the context of political institutions, and in turn shape politics and public life. This course examines how political scientists think about public policy, showcasing a variety of approaches that take politics seriously. The course focuses on American political institutions and the particular challenges and opportunities they present to the creation and development of public policies. It investigates policymaking processes and institutions, agenda setting, policy design, implementation, sustainability, and feedback.

6182 Campaigns and Elections
4cr | M 5:00-7:00 | Levine, A.

This doctoral seminar examines scholarly research related to campaigns and elections in the American political context. The focus is on questions related to candidate strategy, the broader political context (such as economic conditions), and the conditions under which political campaigns affect political decision-making. Various forms of decision-making are considered, including decisions to turn out, choose a particular candidate, donate money, and volunteer time. (AM)

6293 Comparative Urbanization
4cr | R 6:00-9:00 | Jones-Correa, M. & Kudva, N.

Cities are political assemblages in which institutions of governance are re-shaped as cities morph over time. Each period of city-building responds to challenges ranging from changing migration patterns and large-scale population movements to changes in geo-political power and the technologies of infrastructure, communication and manufacturing. This graduate seminar draws on the experience of cities at two moments in history to examine processes of institutionalization and governance. In particular we focus on industrialization and colonization in the 19th century in Europe and the United States, and the current moment of late global capitalism in the context of a resurgent Asia.

6303 Global Debates and Comparative Political Economy
4cr | T 7:30-10:30 | Turner, L.

For description, see ILRIC 6330.

6313 Parties & Political Representation
4cr | M 10:10-12:05 | Roberts, K.

This seminar explores some of the classic literature and contemporary comparative research on parties, party systems, and political representation. Readings will analyze party system dynamics in advanced industrial democracies as well as new democracies in post-communist and developing regions. They will draw from a range of theoretical perspectives, including the sociological, organizational, and rational choice institutionalist traditions. Topics to be covered include cleavage structures, organizational forms, party-society linkages, electoral strategies, clientelism, electoral volatility, and party system change. Assignments will include a research paper on a related topic. (CP)

6424 The Theory & Practice of Democratic Politics in Africa
4cr | TR 8:40-9:55 | van de Walle, N.

How has politics evolved in Sub Saharan Africa since a wave of democratic reforms swept through the region in the early 1990s? This seminar aims to examine the process of democratization in the region, the extent and limits of democratic reforms and their implications for politics in the region. The class will thus examine the emerging literature on “hybrid” regimes, which combine features of democratic and authoritarian politics; on the dynamics of recent elections, such emerging practices as vote buying, and the party systems that have emerged from two decades of elections; and on the impact of democratic practices on socio-economic outcomes. (CP)

6494 Agrarian Political Economy
4cr | M 2:30-4:25 | Herring, R.

Comparative political economy of pre-industrial and transitional societies, stressing alternative theories of dynamics of peasant society, rural development, environmental change and linkages to urban and industrial sectors and international system. We emphasize the impact of property systems and public law on human welfare and collective action. Theoretically, we explore the tensions between materialist political economy and competing interpretive frameworks. (CP)

6509 Contemporary Readings of the Ancients: Plato
4cr | W 2:30-4:25 | Rubenstein, D.

Occasioned by the new publication of Alain Badiou’s Republic, this semester we will focus on contemporary continental readings of Plato. A significant part of the semester will involve a close reading of The Republic, inspired by Badiou and Avital Ronell’s Loser Sons. Other texts will include Timaeus and The Phaedrus; Derrida, Baudrillard, Le Doeuff and Irigaray will figure among the interlocutors. (PT)

6605 Theoretical Approaches to Ideology
4cr | M 2:30-4:25 | Smith, A. M.

Profound controversies revolve around the definition of “ideology,” its relationship to the interests of dominant groups, the means by which it is circulated throughout diverse social sites, its capacity to influence worldviews and identifications, and its institutional expression. We will lay the groundwork for the seminar by examining social contract theory and key texts on ideology by Marx and Foucault. In the second part of the course, we will explore various schools of ideological analysis; for the spring 2013 version of the seminar, we will focus in particular on feminist and critical race theory.

6766 Pluralism
4cr | R 2:30-4:30 | Livingston, A.

This course examines the multiple waves of pluralism in American political science and their contribution to contemporary political theory. Once criticized as a narrow and instrumental vision of politics, pluralism has undergone a renaissance in recent years as both a political problematic and as a tradition of political analysis. Beginning with the early twentieth-century visions of pluralism (James, Laski, Kallen, Lippmann), this seminar will explore the ways in which mid-century (Dewey, Dahl, Berlin, Niebuhr) and contemporary waves of pluralism (Rawls, Rorty, Hampshire, Tully, Young, Connolly) have rejected some concepts, recovered others and introduced new ones. We will focus on the development of such concepts as: multiplicity, order, pluralization, sovereignty, experience, process, identity, interests, disagreement, and association. In returning to the early pluralists, we will examine the sorts of ontological projections diverse political theories make, even when they claim to be ‘political, not metaphysical’.

6775 Language & Politics
4cr | T 4:30-6:30 | Frank, J.

This course explores the “linguistic turn” of recent political theory alongside canonical debates over the political and epistemological consequences of different philosophies of language. Writers examined will include Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Austin, Derrida, Butler, and Cavell.

6827 Unifying while Integrating: China in the World
4cr | T 10:10-12:05 | Carlson, A.

Seminar intended to examine the increasingly complex relationship that has evolved between China and the rest of the international system during the 1980s and 1990s. Emphasizes the interrelated, yet often contradictory, challenges facing Beijing in regard to the task of furthering the cause of national unity while promoting policies of integration with international society and interdependence with the global economy. Concentrates especially on ongoing controversies over the rise of Chinese nationalism and the persistence of “minority nationalism” in many regions within China.

6897 International Security
4cr | M 2:00-4:25 | Kreps, S.

This course will examine a variety of international relations theories in studying a broad range of security issues, including the causes of war, alliance formation, balance-of-power politics, security regimes, nuclear and conventional deterrence, the democratic peace, military strategy, international terrorism, and domestic constraints on the use of force. We will use a variety of theoretical perspectives to investigate these and other issues, paying particular attention to evaluating the theoretical arguments with both historical and systematic evidence. (IR)

6927 Planning and Management of Agriculture and Rural Development
4cr | M 2:30-5:00 | Uphoff, N.

For description see: IARD 6030.

6937 Going Nuclear: Spread of Nuclear Weapons & Energy
4cr | T 10:10-12:35 | Way, C.

What are the causes and consequences of the spread of nuclear weapons and of nuclear energy? Why do some countries pursue nuclear weapons while others refrain from doing so? What are the consequences of the spread of nuclear weapons? What are the drivers of the spread of nuclear energy? Who can operate nuclear energy plants safely, and who cannot? And will the widely predicted “nuclear renaissance” still occur given the Fukushima-Daiichi disaster? This class is a research seminar aimed at heightening awareness of methodological problems entailed in attempting to gain causal knowledge about questions like these. We will work on developing skills to improve both descriptive inference and (where possible) causal inference on topics that fall under the umbrella topic of “going nuclear.” Assignments center on a substantial original research project. A basic research design class or social sciences methods class would provide useful background, although it is not a prerequisite. Familiarity with nuclear weapons/energy issues is not required to take the class. (IR)

6999 CPAS Weekly Colloquium
1cr | R 4:30-6:00 | Lowi, T., et. al.

Colloquium is the weekly seminar series hosted by the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA). It is also a required, one-credit course for al CIPA Fellows, and is graded S/U based on attendance. The colloquium series is a collaborative effort between the CIPA Colloquium Committee and the faculty and staff of CIPA.

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